Tuesday, April 3, 2012

C = Carnavalet Museum - A-Z Blog Challenge


Courtyard and Garden, Carnavalet Museum, Paris - by Green Eye

The Carnavalet Museum is dedicated to preserving the history of Paris from the its beginning as the city of Lutetia through the Renaissance, the French Revolution, and into the twentieth century.  The Carnavalet Museum is located at 23 Rue de Sévigné, Paris, in the Marais, 4th Arrondisement.


In the courtyard, a courtly sculpture of Louis XIV, the Sun King, greets the visitor.  Manicured formal gardens on a city scale surround the walkways.  Netting covers the top portion of the building to protect the sculptures and the area below.



Louis XIV, the Sun King, Carnavalet Museum by DG Hudson
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The museum occupies two neighboring mansions, the Hôtel Carnavalet, built in 1548, and the former Hôtel Le Peletier de Saint Fargeau.  (Hôtel = House or Residence)

Below is shown a bust of Camille Desmoulins (March 2, 1760 – April 5, 1794), an associate of M. Robespierre, of revolutionary fame. 


Camille Desmoulins in Musee Carnavalet, Paris by DG Hudson

Walking through the museum, I was reminded of the upheavals that took  place during the French Revolution.  It was a dangerous time to be in France.

Certain rooms in the Carnavalet Museum have an intimate feel due to the lighting, which protects antique documents and fabrics in display cases.  The rooms retain the decoration of the period, with strong jewel colours and gilding.  Chandeliers have replaced candlelight.

Commercial signage hangs near the entranceway, metal custom signs that indicated your type of business.  Small models show an aerial view of Paris in the 1700s.  Below is a model of the Bastille before its demise on July 14, 1789.



La Bastille Model -fortress, arsenal and prison, by DG Hudson


The Carnavalet Museum is near the trendy rue des Francs-Bourgeois and Place des Vosges, a great meeting place if you need a break from the walking.  There are other museums in the area tucked in neatly along the older two-lane streets in the Marais.  We visited on the weekend, when lots of people comb these side streets.

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Links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnavalet_Museum

http://www.parisdigest.com/museums/museecarnavalet.htm

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/219315/French-Revolution

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Photos taken in Paris, France by DG Hudson unless otherwise noted.  The Carnavalet Museum can be found on one of the side streets in the Marais.
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Comments are welcome. Do you like history?  Domestic or world?

22 comments:

  1. Someday I will get to Paris. Just to practice my French. This is a great little adventure.Thanks for sharing.

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    1. You're very welcome. More to come on Paris, Anne. I've also got to practice my French before I go back again.

      I'll be visiting soon.

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    1. Yes, Farawayeyes, too bad we can't chat as we stroll. (everything virtual).

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  3. Wonderful post. Wonderful blog. I'm now following yours. Would love it if you took a peek and followed mine!

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    1. Thanks for following, Nancy and welcome! I will definitely check out your blog, and comment.

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  4. I'm more interested in world history than domestic history. There's more diversity.

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    1. Domestic history, you know, Rick, if you went to school in the states. My elementary and secondary education was in the States.

      I've always loved World history, it's been around longer. The French are very proud of their history and care for it very well, as far as I can tell. I like that. Preserve rather than destroy. We need a little of both (old and new) to remind us where we've been.

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  5. i love your topic. while i'm more of a london person...paris is so truly beautiful!

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  6. I love history and I love Paris and I'd never heard of this museum. Now I have to go back. Sigh!
    Karen

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  7. That would be a really interesting place to visit. I'm hoping to visit all the blogs on the A-Z Challenge in April.

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  8. Hi DG .. I can't believe it - did my Bridge comment disappear - it was quite long .. or is it in spam? I've had to pick one or two out.

    This museum looks fascinating and definitely one I'd like to visit on my next trip to Paris .. looks so interesting ..

    Not sure if you've got an email .. but mine's on my blog profile ..

    Cheers Hilary

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    1. Yes, my spam catcher mistook what it was, perhaps due to length. I'm not sure. I had issues with Blogger on Monday, but not since then. I will drop by your blog. I appreciate you making the extra effort!

      Glad you liked the post, this IS a fascinating museum, like walking through a house of the period, with some furnishings still intact.

      I wanted to visit the Picasso Museum, which is also nearby, but it was closed for maintenance.

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  9. Whoa. Paris used to be called something other than Paris? Amazing. I never knew.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, Matt, and glad you learned something new about Paris.

      The Romans always put their stamp on what they conquered. I loved seeing the ancient Roman ruins under Notre Dame.

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  10. Stephanie - next time, we're going to try and fit London (at least for a day) into our trip plans.


    Karen W. - This museum is hidden in the area between the Marais and the old Bastille area, a very neat district to explore, especially on the weekends.

    Sharkbyes - it's a big list, I'm making my way through it too! Thanks for stopping by.

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  11. I'm sure the Bridge comment will appear soon - hasn't done so yet .. but glad you got it.

    I must remember the Picasso museum is nearby .. the museum is definitely a must visit one ..

    Thanks for telling us about it .. and for finding my spammed and binned comment - hopefully it'll surface sometime!! Cheers Hilary

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  12. Liked your C post, Hilary and left my comment at your blog. Anything about English castles falls within my radar.

    Thanks for sharing.

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  13. Great post! I love French history, especially from the Revolution. Fascinating stuff. Thanks for the info. I hope I can get to the Carnavalet someday.

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    1. I like that period in history as well, and this museum has an excellent display. Easy to get some story ideas here.

      I'll be checking out your blog, too. Thanks for the follow.

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  14. I love world history, because culture and cross-cultural interaction fascinates me. I didn't quite make it into Anthropology, but the International Business program I studied was very cross-culture intensive.

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