Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Norse Mythology and 'Secrets of the Ash Tree'

Sága – Norse Goddess



Sága and Odin converse while holding cups by
by Lorenz Frølich WC-PD*


Boon companion of Odin, she had other talents, as well. . . 


Sága was a patron of Seers and Writers.

Scrolls and mead was sacred to Sága. She is called an obscure goddess, yet she is linked to poetry and the poetic arts (writing and history). She inspires with prophecies. Her name is associated with the Norse meaning 'to see', this may imply that Saga was a seeress, as was Frigg.

The overlapping of the two names and their meanings has led to various theories on the connection of Sága to Frigg. Sága is said to be the handmaiden of Frigg and the daughter of Odin, or an incarnation of Frigg. An elusive goddess may be that way for a reason.

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My Goblet is Empty. . .

Reclining against the branches of the overturned tree, knocked down by her father Odin, Sága set her hammered gold chalice on the branch hook and looked at him.


"Your turn, Father Odin."

"No, my dear, I'm sure it's your turn."

"I've gone to the wine cellar twice already."

"But I'm your father, I have a reputation to protect."

"I'll write a poem about this, you know."

"Be sure you describe me as handsome."

***

Óðinn and Sága drink from golden cups.
Art by Jenny Nyström, WC-PD*

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For those who like Mythology. . .
A gift of prose to the Norse Gods, will be celebrated with a blogfest on Oct 9, 2013


‘Secrets of the Ash Tree’
by Siv Maria Ottem







Siv celebrates her new book, ‘Secrets of the Ash Tree’, with Captain Ninja- Alex Cavanaugh and the Norse Gods at the well of Urd. A Norse Gods blogfest party is being held on Siv's birthday, October 9th! There will be presents for certain lucky participants. Siv's blog tour for the release of ‘Secrets of the Ash Tree’ will be from October 7th-14th.

Tell us something about Norse Mythology and learn about a new book, one which might make you want to think about your own secrets. Details are available at Been There Done That:or at Alex's blogsite.

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Do you follow Siv's blog, Been there, Done that? Do you like Mythology? Did you know of Sága, the elusive Goddess?
Please share in the comments, I'm listening. Thanks for stopping by!
***

References:

http://sivmaria.blogspot.ca/2013/08/party-with-norse-gods.html Blogfest with Norse Gods

http://alexjcavanaugh.blogspot.no/ Alex's place

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%A1ga Saga (goddess) and Sokkvabekkr (location)

http://goddesses-and-gods.blogspot.ca/2008/11/saga-norse-goddess-of-prophesy.html
Saga (goddess)

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Art Credits:

Image #1 - Saga and Odin

An illustration from Fredrik Sander's 1893 Swedish edition of the Poetic Edda. Reprinted with Erik Brate's 1913 translation which in turn is published by Project Runeberg at http://runeberg.org/eddan/ from where the image is taken. Published before 1909 and thus in the public domain in the United States.

35 comments:

  1. Those gods sure do like to drink! Loved my Goblet is empty. Very good choice on Saga, both her and Kvasir were gods of poetry. Thanks for participting and honoring the Norse Gods with me today on my birthday!

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    1. Glad you liked it. Hope your birthday is a great one!!

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  2. Writers should all wish for a visit from Saga then.

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    1. She visits my muse, Calliope, occasionally.

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  3. An excellent choice for the blogfest. I didn't even know about Saga as a goddess before, but I like the idea of a patron of seers and writers. :))

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    1. I liked it too, and I like your new icon photo! It appeals to my camera eye. (the silhouette of a writer)

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  4. Oh I'm learning all about the God today. :)

    http://shahwharton.com/

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    1. There seems to be many varieties. I picked a female just to balance the festivities.

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  5. Hi, D.G.

    Loved you're banter between father and daughter. I also found the connection between the two goddesses intriguing. Norse mythology, like Greek and Roman is so complicated at times.

    Congrats to Siv!!!!

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    1. Thanks, Michael! It's fun trying to unravel all the variations in mythology, our legends.
      Siv picked a great subject.

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  6. Patron saint of writers...I should have picked her. Glad you did. Awesome choice and Happy Norse God blogging!

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    1. All writers can use a patron saint, or muse. I'm encouraging her to visit Siv today, which she promised to do.

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  7. Leave it to creative you to select Saga. And like, Siv, I loved your flash fiction. As Michael said, I really enjoyed the banter between Odin and his daughter. Have a great mid week yourself!

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    1. Coming from the man who thought up Meilori's, that's a compliment, Roland. Glad you liked the dialogue scene. Gods must have wit and humor, or they wouldn't have dealt with humans.

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  8. "Be sure you describe me as handsome."

    :)

    It's interesting to me how many stories there are about creatures that inspire prose of all sorts. What *is* that source, really?

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    1. No wonder so many of us write. Perhaps that source is the wisdom of olden times advising us to document our history. It connects us. Good question, Suze.

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  9. Nice flash fiction to go with your post! This is a very interesting and fun Blogfest.

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    1. I think so, too, Stephen, I'm learning more about Norse mythology in its many variations.

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  10. Hi, DG,
    Now I know where saga comes from. I've learned a thing or two today by being in this hop.

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    1. It makes sense to me. I'm writing one of those sagas too.

      I've learned a few things on this blogfest too. Who knew about mistletoe?

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  11. Great choice, I've been learning so much about Norse mythology from this bloghop. I love it--'Saga.' Who knew?

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    1. This type of blogfest will leave many of us, myself included, much more knowledgeable about Norse mythology. (they're more visible right now, with movies, graphic comix, etc)

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  12. Ha! I love your little ode at the bottom of this post. What a great choice! I hate how so many of the goddesses are so obscure. There must have been more, and it just breaks my heart that so much was lost.

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    1. We just have to research to find the obscure. Stories and legends change over time, and parts are omitted as a story travels.

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    2. Considering the political climate when these myths were finally written down, I suppose we're lucky we have as much as we do.

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  13. Saga - makes perfect sense. And who wrote My Goblet is empty? I liked it.

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    1. 'My Goblet is empty' came to me when I found those two images of Saga and Odin. Glad you liked it.

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  14. Patron of seers and writers...perfect!

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  15. Loved the "my goblet is empty" excerpt. Describes me on many nights, lol. This is a goddess I could truly adore - except I don't write poetry.

    ......dhole

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    1. Neither do I, Donna, it got me into trouble.

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  16. Another writerly connection and another God of which I was unaware. So much to learn today through this hop.

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    1. Every civilization has its own story. I agree there is much to learn.

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  17. Great info on a lesser known goddess. Sorry I'm late making rounds on the hop.

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    1. Late is acceptable here. I'm glad you did.

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