Wednesday, April 23, 2014

T = Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri de - A to Z Challenge

ART: Artists, Art Trivia, Art Legends

A glimpse of the ART world, in the manner of an alphabetical mini-art tour. ART focuses on artists and art movements between the 1850's-1960's. There are exceptions.


Can you spot the artist in the painting?



Self-portrait in the crowd, At the Moulin Rouge,  by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892, PD*-WC


T = Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri
1864 - 1901


Henri Marie Raymond de Toulouse-Lautrec-Monfa, or alternately, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec was a French painter, printmaker-lithographer, draughtsman and illustrator. His portrayals of the colorful theatrical life of Paris in the late 1800s gave us a collection of elegant and provocative images of the underside of the 'modern' life of those times.
Toulouse-Lautrec was a Post Impressionist artist, in the company of other well-known painters Cezanne, Van Gogh and Gauguin.

Toulouse-Lautrec immersed himself in art, since he was unable to participate in the sports that other men his age enjoyed. He recorded in his works many details of the late 19th-century bohemian lifestyle in Paris. When the Moulin Rouge cabaret opened, Toulouse-Lautrec was commissioned to produce a series of posters. That opportunity offered him a living of his own, his paintings were displayed in the cabaret, and a seat was always reserved for him.



The Moulin Rouge landmarks, Montmartre, Paris, by DG Hudson

 
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec met and befriended Oscar Wilde, while in London. When Wilde faced imprisonment in Britain, Henri was a very vocal supporter. Toulouse-Lautrec's portrait of Wilde was painted the same year as Wilde's trial.


Oscar Wilde, c.1895, by H. Toulouse-Lautrec


During his career of less than 20 years, Toulouse-Lautrec created 737 canvases, 275 watercolors, 363 prints and posters, 5,084 drawings, some ceramic and stained glass work, and an unknown number of lost works. Toulouse-Lautrec's skilled depiction of people relied on his painterly style which is highly linear and gives emphasis to contour.

Toulouse-Lautrec was placed in a sanatorium shortly before his death in 1901. He died at age 36 at the family estate from complications due to alcoholism and syphilis.

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Did you know Toulouse-Lautrec also did illustrations in the Art Nouveau style? (in some of the posters) Do you like his art? Any special paintings that you like, if you do like his work?

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Brought to you by the A to Z Blog Challenge 2014 Team and the originator: Lee of Tossing it Out. Click the A to Z list of participants and read on. Hope to see you again throughout the blogfest.




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References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_de_Toulouse-Lautrec Wiki on Toulouse-Lautrec


IMAGES - PD-WC

(Images of posters with the 'Moulin Rouge' brand showing cannot be used, as may infringe copyright) Check images for more examples.

Self-portrait in the crowd, At the Moulin Rouge, 1892

This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less.

The official position taken by the Wikimedia Foundation is that "faithful reproductions of two-dimensional public domain works of art are public domain".
This photographic reproduction is therefore also considered to be in the public domain. In other jurisdictions, re-use of this content may be restricted;


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Toulouse-Lautrec portrait of Oscar Wilde, c. 1895

This artwork is in the public domain
File Source:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Henri_de_Toulouse-Lautrec
 
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19 comments:

  1. The Moulin Rouge has always creeped me out a little bit for some reason. The woman in the foreground gives me the creeps.

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    1. I know what you mean, Julie, but the lighting in the paintings often came from beneath (small light on table perhaps), which does tend to give the face a creepy look.

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  2. I love his art. For me, it's like a time capsule of that era. Very distinctive. Hadn't seen that one of Wilde before. Very nice.

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    1. Being a fan of Wilde, I like it too, LG. I like the fact that Toulouse-Lautrec tried to support Wilde. I like the painting at the top of this post, too, with the artist in it.

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  3. I have of course heard of him but wasn't familiar with his works. Speaking of Moulin Rouge, I swear that's where we were taken for lunch when I was on that high school trip in 1982, but I don't remember it being a caberet. It was there that most of us ordered hamburgers b/c that's all we could understand on the menu. Sure didn't taste like beef. I overheard one of the chaperones say, 'I think this is horse meat'. So gross. Is there a restaurant next to it where people eat lunch?

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    1. I've never tried horsemeat, but that was a common complaint from the past. The tour you were on probably took a package deal since it was a group, there are many that include a stop at the Moulin Rouge for lunch or evening. When we there JoJo, there was a Starbucks across the street and there may be a few cafes in the area. We didn't go inside, I know what the shows are like. The area near the Moulin Rouge isn't an area I'd hang around in at night.

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  4. He was my favorite painter when I was a teenager. His paintings and posters were all over the walls of my room. Sort of like the ones of rock stars in the rooms of teenagers of later generations. I loved his art then and now you have made me want to see it again. Thank you, D.G.

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    1. He was tormented about his disability, but he didn't let that stop him. Too bad he drank so much, and died young. I think he looks happy in the painting at the top of the post.
      I'm pleased if I bring back happy memories, Inger.

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  5. He died at 36 and painted that much.... amazing. He was prolific.

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    1. Well he was making a living off the posters and the illustrations, but I think the paintings are the best - we see the night life, the dancers and workers, the essence of the days of the can-can.

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  6. He poured his young life into his art and poured it away through the alcohol that made living with his disability more tolerable. My heart aches for him ... and for Wilde. I, like you, like his self-portrait.

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    1. Yes, and I read Inger's post today, I could identify with her sentiments, too. Wilde doesn't look concerned in that painting, does he? I love hearing when two artists - one a writer - meet and give the other support when the world judges them harshly. Glad you dropped by, Roland.

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    1. As for Toulouse-Latrec, he may have died young, but I suspect he enjoyed some of the fame his drawings brought and perhaps having a dedicated seat at a popular venue. He made the Moulin Rouge an icon of a different sort.

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  8. Hi, D.G.

    I had no idea he died so young.... Knew about the alcoholism and syphilis, though.

    Didn't know he did art nouveau style either. Interesting.

    Many of the modernist painters had a classic art training before veering into the modern aspects of art.

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    1. I'm glad the Moulin Rouge gave him the chance to make his mark in art history by giving him that commission.

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  9. My favorite of his has to be "Aristide Bruant dans son Cabaret." This is the one that has "Ambassadeurs" written on top, though I like the others. I was twelve when I first saw it, and it really made an impression on me. It's such a simple drawing, but you get the whole feeling of Paris during that period, at least I do. And it's amazing that the likeness Toulouse-Lautrec painted is so close to what Monsieur Bruant really looked like.

    Stopping by from A to Z...

    John Holton
    http://thesoundofonehandtyping.wordpress.com

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    1. I know which one you mean, I've always liked it too. He encapsulated the Moulin Rouge and Paris excitement into those images. Thanks for visiting.

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  10. His fame was achieved as an artist for his individuality and his joy for Paris. Over here visiting from A to Z.

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