Thursday, November 1, 2012

A View with a Window

A view needs a window to define it.  It's a point of reference.  Move ten degrees either way and the view changes.  Have a peek at these windows, and 'see what you can see'.


A window on old Paris 
Here we could sit and listen to the sounds of the city.  Leaning out over the wrought iron railing, we could see the view four floors above street level, up and down the rue de Rivoli. This window is in an eighteenth century building in old Paris.  How many other people have looked out that same window at that same location, at another time in history?  (During the revolution, this was the way to the Bastille where the monument sits today, and the march of Napoleon entered along this route. )



A Rue de Rivoli Window, Paris, by DG Hudson


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Under the Pyramid at the Louvre
From outside in the daytime, you see a striking glass pyramid, but from beneath the pyramid, you view the fractured blue sky.  That's another wing of the Louvre Museum that's showing through the diamond shapes in the photo below.   On sunny days, the sun streams in, highlighting the lobby area beneath and warming the statues.


Through the Pyramid Glass at the Louvre Museum, by DG Hudson


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The Back Gardens at Versailles
Looking out at a view of the back gardens provided another diversion for the guests and residents at the Palace of Versailles. Large windows cooled the interiors of the huge palace galleries, and allowed light to fill the dark palace rooms.  Strolling on the roof and in the gardens was in vogue at the time.  This garden was extensive to provide amusement for the royalty and nobles living here.




Versailles,window and balustrade by DG Hudson


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Arched Windows, in the Hall of Mirrors
The photo below is a reflection in one of the mirrored walls.  Having mirrors in the long gallery make it seem wider than it is.  The gilt on the statues, the natural light from the windows, the chandeliers and the mirrors create a light airy effect.  It works.  Versailles can surprise the visitor, I'm glad it was restored.



Reflection, Hall of Mirrors,Versailles, by DG Hudson


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Windows of Remembrance
Beautiful stained glass windows lighten the interiors of family tombs in Pere Lachaise Cemetery highlighting the fresh flowers placed there with care.  Some private tombs have limited access within for a quiet moment or prayers.




Stained glass Window, Pere Lachaise, by DG Hudson


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Would you like windows that you could customize to any virtual scene you  wanted, as many science fiction novels have speculated?   A sensory package for smells, sounds, etc. would need to be incorporated. I'm sure they would create an app for it. 

Do you notice windows as a design element in architecture?  Windows can also play an important part in a story.  What do you think? Please share in the comments, and thanks for stopping by.

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References:

Rue de Rivoli Post
http://dghudson-rainwriting.blogspot.ca/2012/04/r-rue-de-rivoli-to-z-challenge.html

The Louvre Museum
http://dghudson-rainwriting.blogspot.ca/2012/04/l-louvre-museum-to-z-blog-challenge.html

The Palace of Versailles
http://dghudson-rainwriting.blogspot.ca/2012/04/v-versailles-palace-to-z-challenge.html

Pere Lachaise Cemetery
http://dghudson.blogspot.ca/2012/01/paris-pere-lachaise-cemetery.html

33 comments:

  1. Sure, that would be cool!
    Great photos, DG. Some amazing places you've visited.

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    1. Thanks, Alex. I'd like a window I could customize. Especially during our rainy winter season.

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  2. I was talking about windows the other day with my brother. I've been looking for a house and we talked about how single pane windows look great but the double pane ones are energy efficient. Anyway, I only say that because a lot of consideration needs to go into windows that excludes even the view you will be receiving.

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    1. Good point. A window design can make or break a room. Both of our previous houses had windows I liked in the living rooms. I like lots of light.

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  3. the windows themselves are the view!

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  4. Oh, we have similar thoughts. I remember standing in Edinburgh castle looking out the window, and wondering who else had stood there looking down on the city. Queen Mary? James? I had to take a photo through the thick paned glass to remember what I saw,

    And I'd love a window in my house that I could look through and see different places I've been, or might still go to. For now I have to settle for travel photos on the internet. :)

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    1. Wow. Edinburgh Castle! I'd probably do the same in any historical building.

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  5. It's funny, i've always been fascinated by windows. There's something about that between-one-world-and-the-next feeling. I have a number of interesting window photographs.

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    1. That's it exactly, Bryan, the 'between two planes' feeling.

      I'd love to see your 'window' photographs, you could fit them in between the star wars strip and other features.

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  6. I've always wanted to visit the Palace of Versailles. Thanks for including its windows. Someday, I will go.

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    1. I was not keen on visiting Versailles until a friend convinced us we had to see it. Booking a tour with a guide is the way to go. I loved the Hall of Mirrors.

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  7. Lovely pictures. It's so easy to share pictures with others now with smartphones and webcams all over. I would love to sit at that window in Paris, writing at that table.
    I miss seeing the mountains out of every window like I did in the house where I grew up. Too flat where I live now.

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    1. I came from the flatlands, and now live by the mountains.

      The sounds of Paris drifted up through those windows in the first photo.

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  8. My favorite rooms in a home are upstairs, second story, with a view of treetops.

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    1. Mine too. My bedroom always looked into the treetops and I loved that.
      (maybe a sign of a dreamer. . .)

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  9. Great photos -- they took me back 7 years to my trip through France. We're about a mile or so from the beach, so I'd like a virtual seascape window, complete with the sounds and smells of surf and the ocean breeze. Not too much to ask, right?

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    1. A beachy window sounds great. I love the sounds of the surf too.

      Now we just need the inventor to create the windows. (might even be necessary if housing density increases)

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  10. I have visited Paris a few times, but I've lived in London for a few years. That first window you described brought back such a flood of sensual (meaning the five senses :) ) memories: the sounds of the street below, the smells of the city, the feel of the foggy, humid air. Thanks for that flashback!

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    1. Funny how cities imprint themselves upon our senses, isn't it? I'm glad this post stimulated some memories. London is still on my list.

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  11. I take a lot of window shots, too. The scene outside may change, but something about the window itself is timeless.

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    1. Yes, I agree. I like the windows on their own AND what they show me.

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  12. This post makes me miss Paris. The last time I went it was freezing.

    Great pics!

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    1. Thanks, Isis. Was that in the winter or early spring? We were there in autumn.

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  13. I love Paris! These pictures bring back so many memories!

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    1. I'm glad they do, Sherry. We had two windows like that in the apartment.

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    2. I think windows and doorways (and perhaps staircases as well) are natural draws to writers...they spark the creativity of transitions, of journeys yet to be taken. Or at least this is what I always think when I see one. :)

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  14. @ Angela - I agree, writers, including poets, like portals, as they allows us to escape to a different reality, to look outward.

    ". .of journeys yet to be taken." Nice way of expressing it.

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  15. What a great way of looking at windows! Beautiful piece, D.G.

    Your question about the customizable windows immediately brought to my mind sterile, standardized rooms with no access to a real outside...and it made me feel claustrophobic!

    Many a science fiction story has been centered on where we should draw the line between living in reality versus virtual reality. Your window question question goes right along with that theme.

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    1. Thanks, Julie. I think I'd still like a changing window scene, during our winter rainy season.

      Interesting that you see a sterile room. Seeing no view at all would make me claustrophobic.

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  16. Welcome, Sean, and thanks for the follow!

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    1. Actually I may be following you twice. I may have responded to this twice too. I'm still a bit of a Luddite despite being a professional blogger. Anyway, I'd be happy to do something about my Iraq trip for your blog. An archaeology post? An interview? Whatever you think fits best.

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    2. I like the idea of an archaeology interview post - I'll send you an email to discuss.

      Sounds interesting, Sean.

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