Saturday, April 30, 2016

Z = ZELDA Fitzgerald, Author, A-Z Blog Challenge 2016

 Zelda was accustomed to a glamorous lifestyle and liked being the centre of attention.  Her husband F. Scott Fitzgerald tried to give her that illusion for a while. 


Zelda Fitzgerald, age 17 - PD*


Z = ZELDA Fitzgerald, Author
Theme = Authors, AtoZ


Zelda Fitzgerald (née Sayre; July 24, 1900 – March 10, 1948) was an American socialite and novelist, and the wife of American author F. Scott Fitzgerald. Born in Montgomery, Alabama, Zelda was noted for her beauty and high spirits.

She and Scott became the emblem of the Jazz Age, for which they are still celebrated. The immediate success of Scott's first novel This Side of Paradise (1920) brought them into contact with high society, but their marriage was plagued by wild drinking, infidelity and bitter recriminations. Ernest Hemingway, whom Zelda disliked, blamed her for Scott's declining literary output, though she has also been portrayed as the victim of an overbearing husband. 

Zelda first met the future novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald in July 1918, when he had volunteered for the army, and was stationed at Camp Sheridan, outside Montgomery. After showing Scott her personal diary, she found out later, that he used verbatim excerpts from it in his novel.  At the conclusion of This Side of Paradise, the soliloquy of the protagonist Amory Blaine in the cemetery, for example, is taken directly from her journal.

Scott and Zelda quickly became celebrities of New York, as much for their wild behaviour, as for the success of This Side of ParadiseTo their delight, in the pages of the New York newspapers Zelda and Scott had become icons of youth and success—enfants terribles of the Jazz Age.

Zelda received offers to write from other magazines. In June, a piece by Zelda Fitzgerald, "Eulogy on the Flapper," was published in Metropolitan Magazine. The article was intended to be information on the decline of the flapper lifestyle. 


In April 1925,in Paris, Scott met Ernest Hemingway, whose career he did much to promote. Hemingway and Scott Fitzgerald became firm friends, but Zelda and Hemingway disliked each other from their very first meeting. It was through Hemingway, however, that the Fitzgeralds were introduced to much of the Lost Generation expatriate community: Gertrude Stein, Alice B. Toklas, Robert McAlmon and others.

In April 1930, Zelda was admitted to a sanatorium in France where, after months of observation and treatment and a consultation with one of Europe's leading psychiatrists, Doctor Eugen Bleuler, she was diagnosed as a schizophrenicAfter being diagnosed, Zelda was increasingly confined to specialist clinics, and the couple were living apart when Scott died suddenly in 1940. Zelda died later in a fire at the hospital in which she was a resident.

In 1932, while being treated at the Phipps Clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Zelda had a swell of creativity. Over the course of her first six weeks at the clinic, she wrote an entire novel and sent it to Scott's publisher, Maxwell Perkins.

When Scott finally read Zelda's book, a week after she'd sent it to Perkins, he was furious. The book was a semi-autobiographical account of the Fitzgeralds' marriage. In letters, Scott berated her and fumed that the novel had drawn upon the autobiographical material that he planned to use in Tender Is the Night, and which would finally see publication in 1934

In its time, however, Zelda's book was not well received by critics. To Zelda's dismay it sold only 1,392 copies, for which she earned $120.73. The failure of Save Me the Waltz, and Scott's scathing criticism of her having written it—he called her "plagiaristic" and a "third-rate writer"—crushed her spirits. It was the only novel she ever published.


On the night of March 10, 1948, a fire broke out in the hospital kitchen. Zelda was locked into a room, awaiting electroshock therapy. The fire moved through the dumbwaiter shaft, spreading onto every floor. The fire escapes were wooden, and caught fire as well. Nine women, including Zelda, died in the fire. 

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Save me the Waltz
Zelda Fitzgerald, Author




Save Me the Waltz is the only novel by Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald. Published in 1932, it is a semi-autobiographical account of her life and marriage to F. Scott Fitzgerald.

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Did you know Zelda Fitzgerald had written a novel? Have you read This Side of Paradise? Zelda's book was written partly as a response to questions which had arisen from F.Scott's book. Were F. Scott's accusations correct? He had used her material without her permission. . .

Please leave a comment to let me know you were here and I'll respond. Thanks for dropping by! Thanks also for visiting my blog during the A to Z. I appreciate it!



Cover depticting F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald
'The Beautiful and Damned'**


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A to Z Challenge - 2016

It's April again and time for the 2016 Blogging from A to Z challenge  This is my 4th year participating in the challenge! (Previous A to Z  posts at the top of my blog page tabs are: Art A-Z, French Faves, Paris, Etc. 

Thanks to originator Lee (Arlee Bird at Tossing It Out), and the co-hosts and co-host teams who make the challenge run smoothly. See the list of participants, and other important information at the A to Z Blog site.  The basic idea is to blog every day in April except Sundays (26 days). On April 1st, you begin with the letter A, April 2 is the letter B, and so on. Posts can be random or use a theme.



Blogging from A to Z Challenge 2016 - Badge


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References:

Zelda Fitzgerald Wiki
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zelda_Fitzgerald

Save Me the Waltz - Wiki
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Save_Me_the_Waltz

Cover image of  Zelda's book - Public Domain


**The Beautiful and Damned (book cover) See REVIEW here.

This media file is in the public domain in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923.
This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States; this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, Mainland China (not Hong Kong or Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland


IMAGE: Portrait of Zelda, 1919, (PD* = Public Domain)

This media file is in the public domain in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. 
This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States; this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, Mainland China (not Hong Kong or Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland

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29 comments:

  1. No, I had no idea that Zelda had published a novel. My entire knowledge of her is based on Hemingway's portrayal in Moveable Feast, which I know is biased, but that's all I had. Thanks for a very illuminating post! Congrats! on completing the challenge in your usual unsurpassed style. Immensely enjoyed your work this A-Z.

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    1. I knew she had written the novel, but didn't know the name. It's rather sad, if you think she was trying to impress her husband, or was she just trying to show him 'anyone' can write a book?

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  2. I didn't know that! Thank you for the interesting last post of the Challenge. Also, huge thanks for all the posts over the past weeks. I've learned a lot. Have a lovely weekend.

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    1. I'm glad you enjoyed the author posts. I'll be keeping them under a tab at the top of the page (it will be Authors A2Z) Thanks for being a loyal visitor!

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  3. That was so tragic, the way she died. I had no idea she was a writer either.

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    1. A lot of people didn't know about Zelda as she seemed to be in the shadow of her husband. It was a tragic death, but her later life wasn't that happy either as she spent many stays in sanatoriums.

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  4. Scott calling Zelda a "plagiaristic" was a bit much after his lifting her journal entry word for word for his own novel. She was ill; he her husband. He owed her a bit of compassion.

    I didn't know she was an author, though I did know of her tragic death in that fire. :-(

    This has been a fun challenge and your theme really enjoyable. Thanks!! :-)

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    1. Sometimes the glamorous lifestyles hide a lot of ills behind the glitter. Reading Zelda's side of the story would be interesting. I think he should have been more compassionate too, but life is what it is. . .

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  5. Hi DG - I had no idea about this side of their life .. and the stealing of each other's stories (well near enough) ... what a fascinating post.

    Rounding of your A-Z of authors ... these have been brilliant and such a great idea - I shall be back to read more (and again) ... cheers Hilary

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    1. It's like 'secrets at the museum', a show I like on tv, where you learn the details behind what we know. I'm glad you enjoyed it, Hilary!

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  6. J here, of the #atozchallenge Arlee Bird's A to Z Ambassador Team.
    Have you enjoyed the challenge? Did you hop to other blogs? The end of the alphabet here! Reflections sign up is May 9-- mark a calendar.
    My blog's giveaway is still going. I'm encouraging everyone to visit more stops.
    http://jlennidornerblog.what-are-they.com
    Fantastic information. What a terrible and tragic ending to her life!

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    1. It was a horrible way to end her life, as it was for the other nine women there. It isn't unusual for patients in a mental institution to be tied to their beds or locked in rooms especially if they present problems for the staff. Perhaps that's the reason so many 'mental' hospitals are now defunct. (or haunted by the inmates. . .)

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  7. I didn't know he had stolen that part of This Side of Paradise from her journal. Congrats on finishing an extremely well-written and interesting A to Z Challenge 2016.

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    1. Shoddy business, that taking of one's words without asking permission. . .and thanks for your kind words on my posts!

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  8. And thank you so very much for following my journey through the A to Z.

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    1. I feel like we both had traumatic events happening in 2014, we both had our lives changed by those events. Different outcomes, yes, but still nothing is as it was. . .I wanted to know how you could be so strong, Inger.

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  9. Such a tragic ending for her...very sad. Congratulations on the completion of the A-Z challenge :)

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    1. Yes it was tragic! Hope you are enjoying living on 'the continent' as they used to say. I envy you that. . .but hope you'll share somei nsights.

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  10. Hello D.G. Zelda's life was so tragic in so many ways. I've read a lot about her, but some of this was new. I never knew she claimed Scott plagiarized her diary. Interesting. What a couple they would have made in the Jazz Age. I didn't know about Save Me the Waltz, so I will see if I can find a copy to read.

    Well done for the A-Z. No doubt you're glad you made it!

    Denise :-)

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    1. I'd like to find that book too! And yes, now I have another tab that will show up soon 'Authors AtoZ'. All my A to Z posts under one handy tab.

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  11. I haven't ready either of their books and omg how horrible to be locked in a room in a burning building!

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    1. Read the Fitzgerald one first, then Zelda's, if you do read them in the future. Too many of those old hospitals were in even older buildings. . .

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  12. I feel bad for Zelda, he was a powerful and abusive man, she paid the price. He stole from her on more than one occasion. And the jealously of Hemingway probably had to do more with her rejection of him than anything else. Sad state of affairs, for all concerned!
    Great way to finish the A to Z. I just ordered a copy.
    Happy May and the end of the A to Z Challenge!

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    1. Yes, I'm glad I can relax from the daily blogging, but I hope to post more than I did last year. Congrats to you too! Did you order his or her book?

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  13. Wow, what a riveting story. I only knew bits and pieces of it. Burnt to death while being locked up awaiting electroshock therapy? Yikes, what a way to go.

    Steep decline aside, what a time to be alive. It's still amazing to me that there was an era where writers were like rock stars, and partying with them was something special.

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    1. Our choices were more limited then, so writers were a form of entertainment and there weren't so many as now. . .But now writers are invited to speak at conventions if they catch the interest of the organizers.

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  14. Fascinating post, but what a ghastly way to die.

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    1. You said it - a sad way for her to end her sad life: she spent much time in mental hospitals, loss of husband in his forties, and then caught like a fly in a web at the end. . .poor Zelda, even if she was a society flower.

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  15. What a short life - and such a tragic way to die. It doesn't sound like her life with her husband was a good one. Thanks for sharing this about her.

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