Thursday, April 28, 2016

X = X, MALCOLM - Author, A-Z Blog Challenge 2016

He came from a childhood marked with violence, and he took a different road than Martin Luther King. Both suffered for their people.



Malcolm X - c.1960s - PD

X = X, Malcolm, Author
Theme = Authors, AtoZ

For some to say Malcolm X 'got what he preached about (violence)' is callous and shows a lack of understanding at what motivated this man. He cared about his fellow African-Americans and he focused on that. At the time, civil rights workers, students and protesters were being shot and harassed for trying the passive approach with peace marches, etc.

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An African-American leader and prominent figure in the Nation of Islam, Malcolm X articulated concepts of race pride and black nationalism in the 1950s and '60s. A passionate, naturally gifted and inspirational orator, Malcolm X exhorted blacks to cast off the shackles of racism "by any means necessary," including violence. The fiery civil rights leader broke with the Nation of Islam shortly before his assassination. The men charged with his killing were also members of the Nation of Islam.

Malcolm X was born Malcolm Little on May 19, 1925, in Omaha, Nebraska. Malcolm was the fourth of eight children born to Louise, a homemaker, and Earl Little, a preacher who was also an active member of the local chapter of the Universal Negro Improvement Association and avid supporter of black nationalist leader Marcus Garvey. Due to Earl Little's civil rights activism, the family faced frequent harassment from white supremacist groups such as the Ku Klux Klan and one of its splinter factions, the Black Legion. 

In the beginning of Malcolm X's political activities, he would give lectures and met many world leaders. As he started to become a threat (more popular) than the leader of the Nation of Islam, he began to receive threats. There is much that takes place during the height of his activities, too much to include in this post. See the wiki link below for more details.

On the evening of February 21, 1965, at the Audubon Ballroom in Manhattan, where Malcolm X was about to deliver a speech, three gunmen rushed the stage and shot him 15 or more times at point blank range. Malcolm X was pronounced dead on arrival at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital shortly thereafter. He was 39 years old. The three men convicted of the assassination of Malcolm X were all members of the Nation of Islam: Talmadge Hayer, Norman 3X Butler and Thomas 15X Johnson

Malcolm X's legacy as a civil rights hero was cemented by the posthumous publication in 1965 of The Autobiography of Malcolm X: As Told to Alex Haley

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The Autobiography of Malcolm X
Co-written with Alex Haley


The Autobiography of Malcolm X, Cover



The Autobiography of Malcolm X was published in 1965, the result of a collaboration between human rights activist Malcolm X and journalist Alex Haley. Haley co-authored the autobiography based on a series of in-depth interviews he conducted between 1963 and Malcolm X's 1965 assassination. At once a harrowing chronicle of American racism, an unsparing self-criticism and an inspiring spiritual journey, the book, transcribed by the acclaimed author of Roots, shows us another side to the man.

The Autobiography of Malcolm X is a spiritual conversion narrative that outlines Malcolm X's philosophy of black pride, black nationalism, and pan-Africanism. After the leader was killed, Haley wrote the book's epilogue. He described their collaborative process and the events at the end of Malcolm X's life.

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Other titles which Malcolm X either co-authored or wrote himself (some published after his death). This partial list from Goodreads author information.

By Any Means Necessary (speeches, interviews and a letter)
Malcolm X talks to Young People (speeches in USA, Britain, and Africa)
The End of White World Supremacy 1971
The Diary of Malcolm X
The Jackie Robinson Reader 
Malcolm X on African American History
Several additional books of speeches at different time periods

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Did you know Malcolm X wrote or co-wrote books? (These are not fiction, but rather political and historical history of a certain time periodDo you know who Malcolm X is or have you heard of him?

Please leave a comment to let me know you were here and I'll respond. Thanks for dropping by! (my energy is lagging but I'll make it across the finish line. . .)

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A to Z Challenge - 2016

It's April again and time for the 2016 Blogging from A to Z challenge  This is my 4th year participating in the challenge! (Previous A to Z  posts at the top of my blog page tabs are: Art A-Z, French Faves, Paris, Etc. 

Thanks to originator Lee (Arlee Bird at Tossing It Out), and the co-hosts and co-host teams who make the challenge run smoothly. See the list of participants, and other important information at the A to Z Blog site.  The basic idea is to blog every day in April except Sundays (26 days). On April 1st, you begin with the letter A, April 2 is the letter B, and so on. Posts can be random or use a theme.



Blogging from A to Z Challenge 2016 - Badge

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References:

Wiki on Malcolm X (there is much more detail here)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malcolm_X  

The book - The Autobiography of Malcolm X
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Autobiography_of_Malcolm_X


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 March 12, 1964 Image of Malcolm X

PD. "No copyright restriction known. Staff photographer reproduction rights transferred to Library of Congress through Instrument of Gift"


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9 comments:

  1. I have the Diary of Malcolm X but haven't read it. I need to get on that, I think.

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    1. I'd like to read the diary, too. Even Muhammed Ali was interested in this man. I found him interesting, and coming from the south, I know how harshly many blacks were treated.

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  2. I didn't realize he was killed in 65. I would've guessed closer to 68.

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    1. I found the research interesting, and sad.

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  3. I have heard of Malcolm X of course, but haven't read any of his books or autobiography. I didn't know that Alex Haley co-wrote the autobiography, that really makes me want to read it. I've read Roots a long time ago, and I loved it.

    A great X-post DG, illuminating and intriguing!

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    1. I didn't read the book, but Haley seems to have covered even the epilogue and the process for co-authoring the book.

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  4. Zealots of any religion seem to be so distant from my concept of God (I am referring to the murderers of Malcolm X.)

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  5. I should read it, I do remember reading Soul on Ice by Eldridge Cleaver. My education is lacking.

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  6. Hi DG - what a good X word ... I know of Malcolm X ... but really know nothing much else. Looking at your post and the comments I should read up and read Alex Haley's co-authored book with Malcolm X ...

    Fascinating author to be introduced to - cheers Hilary

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