Tuesday, February 12, 2013

PARIS - Odd Shots and Angles

A few of the Paris out-takes*. . .


Tour Montparnasse
 

Tour Montparnasse, the dark tower, Paris by DG Hudson


The Montparnasse Tower is a 210 meter (689 ft) tower, with 59 floors; the 56th floor has a restaurant and viewing. Two years after its completion, the construction of skyscrapers in the city centre of Paris was banned. The dark look comes from a lack of modern style windows, having been built before the 'every-office-has-a-window' trend.
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tour_Montparnasse  Montparnasse Tower
 

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Saint-Jacques Tower in the Marais. . .



Saint-Jacques Tower, Paris by Green Eye, Prop. DGH



Saint-Jacques Tower, the Tour Saint-Jacques, is in the 4th arrondisement of Paris, on the rue de Rivoli.  It stands 52 meters tall (171 ft) and is all that remains of the former 16th century Church of Saint-Jacques-de-la-Boucherie (Saint James of the butchery).

Recent findings date the stone and ornamentation from the late medieval era, and confirm that this was NOT added by 19th century restorers.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint-Jacques_Tower  Saint-Jacques Tower


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A residential inner courtyard in Paris

Taken in one of the buildings from the mid-1800s in the Marais area, this photo from the 4th floor shows an intriguing view of the charming habits of the residents - ceramics (on top of venting unit, right side), or the fresh flowers or herbs in two windowboxes.  Under the cover, are the garbage disposal containers where tenants deposit their trash once a week for pickup.  This area was very tidy and clean. 



Parisian Residential Courtyard, by DG Hudson


It's the little touches that tell you something about the person living within the residence.  Depending on what we see, we can guess that perhaps that person is a gourmand wanting fresh herbs of their own, or a romantic that loves flowers, or a ceramic artist drying a few samples of their wares.  This type of 'imagining' helps feed my writing.

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How do you get those little details into your writing?  Do you use images, observation, or other things to stimulate the imagination? Can you imagine being stuck in that tower from medieval times?  Please share in the comments. 

Happy Valentines Day!
To all the romantics, lovers, and those who just like chocolate and candy.

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*Out-takes, shown in Oxford Dictionary as outtakes, meaning film that was rejected in the editing stages (I'm using it for images in this instance).

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27 comments:

  1. Love your shots. There are some wonderful restaurants around the Tour Montparnasse. (:

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    1. Thanks, Elise. Bet you know the best ones, too. Merci.

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  2. I guess if you want a good view of Paris, you go to the Montparnasse Tower.
    And I'm probably not as good with the small touches as I should be.

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    1. That's one view I've got to see next time.

      In your second book, Alex, I did see small touches that helped define your characters.

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  3. I'm endlessly curious about how people live in other cities when I'm traveling. It is funny how seeing something personal on a balcony can get you thinking about what kind of person lives inside an apartment or house. Very telling details are the best, like those little ceramic pieces.

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    1. Me too, LG. I guess it's obvious I'm an observer. Sounds like you are too.

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  4. How fascinating. Love the photos. Went to Paris a couple of times when I lived in London. Apart from the French disliking the English, I loved it!

    My powers of observation are very good sometimes, horrible inadequate at others. Go figure. I guess it's indicative of one's frame of mind.

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    1. It probably depends on how many distractions there are. In the Louvre I didn't know which way to look first, so I wouldn't miss anything.

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  5. Replies
    1. Merci, and Happy Valentine's Day to you too.

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  6. Welcome, Wendy, and thanks for the follow!

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  7. Replies
    1. Thanks, Lynn. I'd agree on the last two.

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  8. Isn't that something? ONE skyscraper in the whole city. I actually think that's kind of nice, considering how much history is in Paris.

    Thanks for these cool posts, girl~ :o) <3

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    1. My pleasure. It's not the only skyscraper, but the only one in the city centre (old Paris).

      There's also La Défense which has some tall buildings, and can be seen from the tall monuments (the Arc de Triumphe and the Eiffel Tower. But it's so nice to see old Paris kept away from too much modernization!

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  9. Happy Valentines!

    Observation is a big key for me getting details. Although my stories are often set in made-up worlds, they often have a basis in places I've lived or been.

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    1. It sure helps me when I'm creating my characters. It's research.

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  10. I hope you had good chocolate today, DG.

    These pictures are truly impressive.

    xoRobyn

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    1. I had a great day, no chocolate, though.

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  11. Cool photos! I always want to add more description of the settings in my writing, but since less is more, I try to pick just a few words or phrases that create the scene in readers' minds. I'm working on getting better at it.

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    1. Your stories have lots of action, Milo, you don't need much description.

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  12. I remember Paris well after seeing your pictures--the grandiose architecture, the courtyards, the clean streets. Yes, I try to give the little details in my writing.

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    1. If we notice them, we add those details. That's been my experience.

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  13. The dark tower in the first picture looks out of place! Thanks for sharing these lovely pictures!

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  14. Sandra, my best friend, sighs I think too much when I see a movie. Whenever I see a distant shot of Rio or a city in India, I think of the poor souls trapped in such cramped, impoverish dwellings and the magic of the movie is diminished for me.

    Your shots of those towers are excellent. Some parts of Paris remind me of the French Quarter in New Orleans, Roland

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    1. It's the wrought iron balconies or the attention to architectural detail, that reveals New Orleans' French roots.

      Glad you like the photos.

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