Tuesday, June 11, 2013

The Bear with Two Shadows by Roland Yeomans - A Review

For Hibbs, The Bear with Two Shadows, nothing is as it seems.



The Bear with Two Shadows, R. Yeomans


The Bear with Two Shadows
by Roland Yeomans

In this tale based on Native lore, we meet a young bear who must learn patience, humility, and tolerance. He must learn who to trust. The reader will meet mythical and ethereal creatures and characters in this story who appear in later novels. We watch as Hibbs stumbles at times, but recovers. He learns slowly, but he doesn't forget. His companions might disagree with that, but they give their allegiance to him.

The Turquoise Woman, aka 'Grandmother', Surt, and Little Brother, protect and aid the innocent, but innately powerful bear. His enemies gather on another front, taunting and testing him. Hibbs is tossed from one time period to another, where he must recover through his wits and generous heart. He has a confrontation looming and he doesn't like to kill. Will this be his Waterloo? Will he kill to help his mates? Read to find out how he copes.

If you like stories based on Native American lore and legend, try reading The Bear with Two Shadows. Also available in audio format. These are stories fascinating in their composition of mythology, native lore, and social issues. Don't forget to visit Roland's blog, Writing in the Crosshairs. Check out the right sidebar for samples of his writing and his prolific production of stories that will enchant you. His ordering information can be found there.

Roland Yeomans writes in New Orleans, a city with a history and a dark past that won't let us forget what it's endured. He writes of the stories he remembers and creates his own universe in an old part of the city. His native stories and his paranormal tales include a bit of romance, a lot of suspense, literary referencing, and delightful interludes/snarky comebacks between the characters. Roland also offers some of his titles/stories in audio format and as serials.

BTW - If you haven't sampled his Victor Standish series, you should. Many literary characters drop in at Meilori's, the jazz bar, to see what's happening after dark.

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Are you familiar with stories similar to these, based on old legends or lore? Are there stories you remember from your childhood, told in legend or lore form? Have you read any of Roland's books or stories?

I'd love to hear about your own stories or memories. Please share in the comments, and thanks for dropping by.

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References:

http://rolandyeomans.blogspot.ca/

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31 comments:

  1. I've read several of Roland's books but not this one yet.

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    1. I've an interest in native lore, so this one appealed to me, Alex. Bears in the First Nations lore here (west coast) are always shown as having wisdom and generosity - two great gifts.

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  2. Thanks, Alex, for reading so many of my books. D.G. -- thank you for such a lovely review of my book. Hibbs sends an enchantment your way. He wouldn't say what, but his enhantments are always beautiful in some way. :-)

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    1. My pleasure. I'll watch for any stardust or the like. I know how to recognize it.

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  3. I do love that title, and I'm all for leaning on folklore. Great fodder for modern stories.

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    1. Folklore is part of our history. We should continue to pass them on, even integrating references to myths and legends.

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    2. L.G.:
      So much has been lost of our Native American culture. I wanted to breathe new life in the Lakota tales of magic and wisdom. :-)

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  4. I grew up on Swedish folktales of gnomes, giants, and trolls. Later I became interested in Native American stories of wisdom, nature, animals, and so on. I am familiar with Roland from the A to Z and since New Orleans is so large in my life, with hubby and relatives coming from there, I have meant to learn more about his books. I have to get my Kindle and wifi together. A great review, thank you D. G.

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    1. The Native American stories are new to me, and I find them interesting. New Orleans has always intrigued me, but I've not been there. Give Roland's writing a try, you'll be amused.

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    2. Inger and D.G., thanks for the kind words!

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  5. I've never read a book like this, but I do have two of his Victor Standish books on my Kindle. I have no time to read...
    Tina @ Life is Good

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    1. You'll like Victor. He's got a creative way of thinking that I like, and he's always there for the underdog - alive or dead.
      For time to read: take it in 15 min or 30 min chunks.

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    2. Tina, my chapters are short and I promise you'll at least get one smile and one laugh out of each one!

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  6. This sounds quite lyrical, actually. Thank you for profiling it, D.G.

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    1. My pleasure. I'd love to see this made into a movie. . .

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    2. I hope you give it a try, Suze. D. G., I have fantasies of Pixar or Peter Jackson stumbling over it and wanting to make that movie! What a dreamer, right?

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  7. I have not read Roland's book. I do enjoy legends - especially Native American legends. I'm sure this book would be a good read!

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    1. I think you might enjoy it, Sherry, especially if you enjoy Native American legends ... this one and THE LAST SHAMAN, too. :-)

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  8. I've read Roland's book The Legend of Victor Standish and really enjoyed it. Roland has such a great imagination and a wonderful way with words. I need to keep this one in mind, but I also want to continue with the Victor Standish series. Thanks for the review. (:

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    1. I've been captivated by Roland's characters so I understand, Elise.

      Keep this book in mind as well as some of the characters in this book do appear in his other writing.

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    2. Elise, Victor and Alice appreciate your loyalty. Elu, Sam, Rind, and DayStar from Victor's series appear in this novel. Elu especially has a large role. Just saying. :-)

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  9. I haven't read any of Roland's books, but I do love native American folklore. I'm heading straight to his blog... thanks!

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    1. You will be entertained, Susan, and Roland's blog is full of interesting things to read.

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    2. Thanks, Susan, for heading to my blog. I think you would like Hibbs. I know he would like you ... and not for lunch!

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  10. I downloaded this one last year but I haven't had a chance to read it yet.

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    1. I got mine at the end of 2012, but I wanted to read and review it, since the audio version was coming out. It's a richly imagined world that Hibbs lives in.

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    2. L. Diane, Hibbs is patient. The audio version of this is available from Amazon, Audible, and iTunes. Jack de Golia does an amazing job with Hibbs and friends! Give it a try. :-)

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  11. Sam McCord is my favorite of Roland's characters, but I'll have to give Hibbs a read -- or listen.

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    1. He's my fave, too, Milo. I can't forget that old song about 'North to Alaska' where McCord is mentioned. (Big Sam)

      Hibbs is a good read, too, and I think you might like it.

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    2. Thanks, Milo! In the adventures of Hibbs, Elu turns up with talk of Sam, Rind, and who Hibbs' parents really are.

      Estanatlehi, The Turquoise Woman, whose blood runs in Sam's and Elu's veins is a major character, too.

      D.G., don't tell the ghosts of John Wayne, but I took the name Sam McCord from that old song!

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