Friday, June 1, 2012

PARIS - Rooflines and Details

A unique view. . . of the upper levels



Paris-Inner Courtyard Roofline by DG Hudson


The roofline above reminds me of one of the last scenes in Oliver Twist, by Charles Dickens.





Look up -  what's above you?

Most of us don't look up at what looms above us, you need a little observation time for that.  In some instances, we see more of the detail when we examine the photos of a location.   All photos in this post were taken in Paris.




Paris Rooflines - 18th Cent. Courtyard, by DG Hudson



One floor up was a picturesque roofline . . . I kept wondering what the view would be like from those upper windows, or what the rooms look like within.  We were on the fourth floor, looking across the street.  Note the interesting nautical design of an upper window on the left. The circular window tilts to let in air.




Paris, Window variations by DG Hudson


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One note of caution, looking upwards while continuing to move forward can have unforeseen consequences, so stop before you look up.  It's the same feeling as being on a bridge and looking down at water flowing beneath in a different direction than you are walking. Disorienting. 





Paris Signage, Retro-style Train by DG Hudson




The metal train shown above was attached to the building of a shop, reminiscent of old signage shown in the Carnavalet Museum.  Even those who were unable to read could see the type of business by the merchant's sign.





Red Chimney Pot Roofline in the Marais, by DG Hudson


This residential building shown above could be seen from our apartment window, in the Marais area.  Note the detail around the ledge and molding around the upper level windows.


The best detail is in the Gothic rooflines, like the one below, taken from a side view of Notre Dame.



Notre Dame Side View Roofline, by DG Hudson



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Have you seen any interesting rooflines?  They look different from above (the aerial view) as compared to looking up from below (the ant's eye view) 

Could your Main Character run across the rooftops shown in this post?   One author I've read had the MC do just that in an old town in France.  Please share your thoughts about rooflines in the comments. 

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35 comments:

  1. So much personality! The one with the train is wild.

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    1. We're partial to trains, but we saw a few signs like this with other items. I love the personal touches.

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  2. Oh those are gorgeous! I'm a photographer so I'm always looking for unusual lines and textures.

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    1. You've probably got what I call a 'good eye', then, L. Diane. I tend to notice patterns, and alignment.

      Check out my 'Bridges' post on the 21st century blog to see what I mean:

      http://dghudson.blogspot.ca/2012/06/bridge-across-fraser-river-and-crepes.html

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  3. Hi DG .. rooflines are fun aren't they - so many different perspectives .. they had great shots in the "Hugo" film in Paris ... and my old house used to look across rooves .. an old barn with ancient stones from Pevensey Castle, a tiny cottage that was once a through route to the stables for the barn and fields (as then beyond) ... across tipsy turvy rooves of all ages to the Town Hall Clock ..

    Love these photos though and that train is just great .. cheers Hilary

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    1. Yes, I love rooflines, Hilary! And, I'd love the view you mention in your comment. I'd probably want to sketch that scene.

      I prefer the lofty view to the ant's view, but capturing the image is prime.
      Thanks for stopping by.

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  4. these are great- very interesting!

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    1. Just my photo-eye view of the world, Lynn. Glad you enjoyed them, and nice to hear from you!

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  5. These are great pictures, who would expect to see a train up there.

    I must make a point of looking up more often!

    Thanks for sharing. Jenni

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    1. If you watch people walking during the working day, very few of them look up or around. (partly because we have to see where we're going, I know)

      Just remember to stop first, Jenni. . .

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  6. A nice reminder of European roofs. I always liked the roof in Stockholm so much and some of these were very similar. Nothing like that here, of course.

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    1. Yes it is Inger, and I love them too.
      If Stockholm has similar rooflines, I'd like it there.

      I came to love the look of the red chimney pots in Paris and the blue hue of the rooflines at dusk.

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  7. Odd you asked about if our main character could run across those rooftops your excellent photography detailed.

    I was thinking about how Victor Standish would love those rooftops to race across. In my UNDER A VOODOO MOON, he races against evolved raptors across the similar rooftops of the French Quarter in New Orleans.

    Ernest Hemingway stressed how writers must develop their perception and recall of every detail of their surroundings. As always, a fascinating post, Roland

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    1. Thanks, Roland, guess I'll have to read that book now, too.

      The story I was referring to was Dorothy Dunnett's Lymond series set in the 16th century. In the Carnavalet Museum in the Marais, there was a miniature model of the city of Paris before Baron von Haussman did his cleanup. Half the rooftops extended over or were connected to other rooftops. Fascinating. . .

      Glad you enjoyed the post!

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  8. I really haven't paid that much attention to roof lines unless I'm in a high rise building and that isn't often. The details on the buildings in your pictures are fascinating.

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    1. Thanks, JL, I was taking photos of the courtyard and happened to look up.

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  9. Looking at your photos, I'm struck again by the beauty of the architecture in Paris. There are no rooflines close to where I live here in outer London. Only a low shed before sweeping fields dotted with resting horses. On my daily walk, I pass Elizabethan sloping rooves on the cottages along the old Roman road where I live.

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    1. I love looking at rooftop art sculptures of older buildings. And the artwork on the libby roofs. Lots of this on the East Coast and Midwest. Some of it is awe-inspiring while others is outright morbid and weird.

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    2. Francene: Your walk sounds great, I'd love to walk by scenes like that.

      Stephen, I like weird sometimes too, but I don't recall ever seeing morbid sculptures.

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  10. I'm back to answer your questions about the badge. A blogger friend created it for me. You can copy it if you like, but I don't think it would go that well with your design here. If you like, I could ask if my friend would make you one. She said she likes to do them. You could email and she could take a look at the design of you blog and make one for you. Let me know and I will check with her.

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    1. I would like that. I'll reply on your blog, Inger. I know you've had dental work done recently. Hope you're feeling better.

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  11. I liked the various windows in that one building. Neat. Must look cool from the inside, too. We don't have very many tall buildings here ... OK, none. None as interesting as that. We have mountains.

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    1. That was a municipal building, so couldn't explore it.

      I'm envious of your observatory job, I'd love that.

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  12. Wonderful pictures!

    There are some interesting rooflines in the city around here. The buildings have stood since the early 1900s and they have a lot of fancy woodwork.

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    1. Hi, The houses you mention could be Victorian or Edwardian design.

      Golden Eagle, your new eagle directory is impressive. We get a few bald eagles, and lots of hawks in the Lower Mainland.

      Anyone can check it out here:
      http://www.eagledirectory.org/

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  13. What lovely pictures! Those are so beautiful! And yes, my Main Character could totally run those rooftops :)

    Nice to meet you!
    http://writeskatedream-jmckendry.blogspot.com

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    1. Welcome Jess, and thanks for the follow. If your MC can do that, I might want to read that book!

      Glad you enjoyed the photos.

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  14. Welcome, Jessica K., thanks for the follow. Interesting question on your blog today (pen names).

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  15. You think like I do. I often wonder what those upper floors are like. I want to see how others live, if anyone even lives there. I look at the upper floors of some of the older buildings in downtown L.A. and it looks like they're vacant.
    I want to be nosy--I want to explore.

    Lee
    A Faraway View
    An A to Z Co-host blog

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    1. You're right Lee, I am curious (I wrote a post about that in 2010.

      Link:
      DG Hudson-Rainforest Writing-Curious or just plain Nosy?

      I haven't seen downtown LA in years. Take pix if you get to explore those upper floors.

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  16. Nice pictures. I need to look up more. I did get a nice picture of the roof on Chartres Cathedral once.

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    1. Glad you like the pics. My favourite is the first one. Thanks for dropping by!

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  17. I love the pics of Paris skylines! I live in the desert, not a rainforest, so there's not much to see near me ... maybe that's why I write so much. :-)

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    1. Thanks, Lexa, glad you like the rooflines. Paris does look a lot different than the desert! So thanks for sharing your own photos.

      I dropped by your blog to say thanks for the follow.

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  18. Welcome Kate! Nice to meet you and thanks for the follow.

    I visited your blog and left a comment.

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