Monday, March 10, 2014

2014 National Wormhole Week and Beyond

Let the Wormfest Celebrations begin!


Albert's birthday is the 14th


Welcome to the Second Annual 2014 National Wormhole Week Blogfest also called the 2014 Wormfesthosted by: L. Diane Wolfe, Alex J. Cavanaugh, and Stephen Tremp.


Assignment 1 - Name one thing where science advances mankind
Learning to navigate the wormholes and the ability to jump parsecs.

Wormhole transport tubes benefit trade and travel, and faster transit times aid in colonization and reaching outposts. On the negative side, generations of men and women piloting the TradeRunnerTransports are reporting negative effects on family life. Following is one example.


WormHole Stories: Virtual Man


John and I waited for the Go-Ahead from Central Control. We were next in the WH-4 takeoff zone. All the specs and equipment were checked. Something was bothering him. I could tell by the way he held his jaw.

"Any plans for the holidays, John?"

"Not yet. I don't know what the family wants to do. I don't see them for so long, in between our trade runs. . .  it's hard missing their growing up."

"You know this job pays very well. It helps your family."

"Knowing what has to be done doesn't make it easier. I'm just a ghost in their lives. I don't know how much longer I can do this work."

"There's the Go Ahead light. Activating all stability thrusters. What makes now any different than any other time?"

"It's my wife's birthday."

He pressed the key to start our descent into the energy field. The ship slid for a short distance until the energy tube caught and secured our vehicle on the access ramp. Time halted for what seemed like only seconds as the undulations of the Wormhole folded twice before delivering us to Grand Central Skystation, the supply nexus for the outer quadrants.

There was nothing I could say. Working these long Traderunner routes was starting to tell on my partner.





Free Use Image


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Assignment 2 - Name a technology with unforeseen consequences that will go too far and set mankind back.' Two examples of books on this topic:

Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake.
When Technology and science are given unbridled rein, a collision with nature can be expected. One era ends. A new one begins. . .

David Brin's Uplift Wars highlighted problems due to diversity: more languages to learn, more politics, more insider secrets, and intrigues. Uplifting means elevating creatures (such as dolphins) into sentiency if they pass certain tests and can communicate with other species.

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Q and A

Are wormholes intelligent? Or are they merely 'transit tubes' with optional endings? 
No intelligence is evident in the wormholes at present, they function as a pathway to another point in time and space.

Einstein oriented us to where we should go, and it's up to our scientists to get us there. We need intergalactic starships and a combined earthly effort, or we'll never get past Mars.

What could they possibly trade to aliens or even humans of the future? 100%Chocolate Bars, MPax's* universal exchange commodity, and two Iron Chefs.

Should we try music as in Close Encounters?
Yes. How about wildlife sounds from the jungles, whales singing in the deep and winds blowing through the mountain passes? Earthy sounds.

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Before you go. . .

Answer any of the above questions Or leave a comment to say you were here. Thanks for dropping by!

To get back to the other participants -  Linkylist at Stephen Tremp's blog.



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References:

46 comments:

  1. I think I completely missed the point of this wormfest. But reading your story (loved it) and your comments to the negative reminded me of Pop Travel, but Tara Tyler.

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    1. All interpretations are valid, Rhonda, there can be many points. . .it's scifi after all. Glad you liked it.

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  2. Sad story. As a military brat, I know it was hard on my mother when my father was away for long stretches of time.
    Wormholes intelligent? Definitely a no.
    Thanks for participating in the blogfest!

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    1. It's hard on parents, and harder on kids. Glad to join a scifi blogfest.!

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  3. Dolphins are smart, but I don't think they are that smart.

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    1. Brin handled this very well, but yes, I had hoped for bipeds. . .

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  4. Hi DG - I need to come back .. but just wanted to say .. I'd decided I just not might make this blogfest and my wormholes might still be soaking wet, well they are!

    So I kept my options open .. but sadly I'm not good at blogfests, but I'll hit one or two posts along the way - and I'll be back here ..

    Cheers Hilary

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    1. Whatever works for you,Hilary, I was wanting to find out if you had unearthed a wormhole in the Underground. . .

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    1. I wonder is the villains could learn how to hide in the crevices of a wormhole? Like the old train robbers.

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  6. Chocolate has been an excellent goodwill gift in modern times. Perhaps more useful would be duct tape. Everyone can find a good use for duct tape at some point in time.

    Lee
    Wrote By Rote
    An A to Z Co-host blog

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    1. Great idea, Lee. More useful than beads, but one needs a cutting utensil of some sort to hack off small pieces.

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  7. D.G., now this was a fun post to read! I never thought of writing dialogue of a story. But I love it!

    And we will need a unified combined effort here on Earth to reach beyond Mars. Wow! That sounds like a more demanding obstacle than reaching Mars itself.

    Thanks for participating.

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    1. Yes, but 'first we get our ship, then we take the moon'. We need a round table again, as King Arthur had.

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  8. I was here. Just so you know. I saw Gravity last night, but only here at home on TV, so didn't get the full effect. Still, based on what happened to them, wormholes my just be the way to go. Loved all of this.

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    1. Hi Inger! 2001 comes to mind, and Hal, the computer, and the obelisk. . .haven't seen Gravity, though.

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  9. We think we understand about wormholes. But our perception of reality is limited to the dimensions we know -- there may be many more. I'll wave Bye-Bye to the explorers from this time shore and not chance becoming DNA puree!

    Loved your flash fiction.

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    1. There's so much we don't know about science, it obeys laws of its own. I'm not sure how adventurous I'd be either, Roland.

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  10. I like the idea of trading chocolate bars with aliens, that's assuming they might have a sweet tooth. If not, they might be offended. I'm not sure what they would bring us - perhaps more germs?

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    1. You never know what offends, but it's a start. The germs would likely go both ways.

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  11. 100% chocolate bars. You've been reading Backworlds!

    Loved the way you presented this as an assignment. Now point me in the direction of one of those wormholes...

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    1. WH-4 on the right, Ellie! Yes, Backworlds and MPax have the right idea.

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  12. Whale song worked in Star Trek Voyage Home! I like the chocolate too! :)

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    1. Simple things, hopefully are the least likely to offend, but there was that bit in Mars Attacks where the peace dove was shot. Hmmm.

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  13. As far as music goes, good choices, but would any life force be able to resist Pharrel Williams "Happy" song? Our alien visitors would be in a good mood. :-)

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    1. I don't know, some species might interpret smiling as aggressive since we 'bare' our teeth, so not sure if a happy song would have the desired effect.

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  14. This is a different blogfest D.G. I'm a fan of Margaret Attwood. Your examples were interesting.

    Great to see you signed up for WEP this month.

    Denise

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    1. I took an imaginary turn on this one, as the serious science is progressing so slowly. Or maybe they just aren't telling us. . .

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  15. Very creative with this bloghop. I can't imagine actually traveling through wormholes. Sounds lonely.

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    1. You might not have time to feel lonely, folding space is supposedly fast and smooth. Being away from one's family would be a big hurdle, Robin.

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  16. I like your story of the wormhole warriors. Interesting indeed. Many travel the Earth now just to fund the family's needs. So many questions with technology, too. Oryx and Crake is such a cool novel, yet chilling in its truth.

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    1. I just picked up another Atwood book, based on mythology. It came from our local library. Glad you enjoyed the wormhole scene. . .

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  17. Hi DG - I can see John's dilemma in many of today's workers with or without family .. great story line though.

    Loved your answers ... let nature tell its story to others .. I really should read more .. the Margaret Attwood book sounds fascinating, as does the David Brin book ..

    Perhaps we're creating a 2nd universe here on earth .. a social media one ... and if we end up warring much more .. who knows ... I think a wormhole might well be needed .. cheers Hilary

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    1. Hi Hilary! The only problem with our social media universe is that it fails if our technology fails. Man needs to war less, but what happens if we are beset from beyond. . .will we lose our defensive skills or have robot warriors?

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  18. Hi DG! At last I've found time to visit your Wormfest blog. Nice ideas here. I think the concept of family if people are travelling in space without them becomes very difficult. I can't think of too many space travellers in fiction who have had families unless they were with them (or the kids were at boarding school/space academy).

    Looking forward to your #atozchallenge posts too.

    Jemima
    Sign up for the A to Z Challenge Theme Reveal Blogfest

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    1. Three scifi with family: DUNE with the Atreides family, ENDER in the later novels where he exiles himself in space with his sister Valentine, and Lost in Space, the traveling family with the robot.

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  19. I think generation ships were mentioned in Alastair Reynolds' CHASM CITY -- we get so used to ships moving at the speed of light in SciFi, we forget how vast space really is. I liked your Traderunner tale. Weren't wormholes temples to the gods in STAR TREK DS9? Or home to non-temporal beings...

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    1. I know I've heard that term, Milo, but not sure where. As for the wormholes being temples, I don't recall that one. Makes me want to check now that you've stirred my curiosity.

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  20. Great answers! I like the term "transit tube."
    And I def foresee collision with nature. Inevitable.

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    1. I do too, but I think that's Stephen's term that appears in the questions he posed. That's what they would be used for if they appeared in multiple places - like portals in fantasy.

      Atwood's story seems more YA to NA in my mind, due to the ages of the characters when they first meet. Thanks for the visit, PK.

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  21. I don't think wormholes are intelligent, but you never know!

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    1. Wormholes don't appear to be intelligent, but there may many intelligent forms of life that are not recognizable to us. (just so they are not gigantic DUNE worms adapted to space. . .)

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  22. Hope I'm better late than never here...
    This different was what I've seen so far. Many points and many questions. I saw an Outer Limites episode once where I plantet was a living organism, but I don't know about wormholes.
    Good post.

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    1. Late is okay with me, and yes it was different, but that's the fun of a blogfest.

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  23. Very creative. That new cosmos show is getting me into this space stuff.

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    1. That's good news for scifi authors! That show is promising.

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