Tuesday, March 25, 2014

WEP - My Eyes Don't Lie, Do They?

Remember what your childhood was like? Here's a futuristic version of one young boy's life.
 

 




MY EYES DON'T LIE, DO THEY?

'It's a lie. If it's not true, it's a lie. I don't believe there are planets like that. Not anymore. That was long ago, in ancient Terran times. The elders speak of hairy creatures on four legs, of plants called trees, of wood and vast amounts of water. Where I live we have underground rock, surface rock, and rock dust."


I live in SRS-1 Colony, the only home I've ever known, and it's wholly underground. This journal I keep for others, those who come after. Everyone calls me Dak. I don't know if that's my real name, but I don't mind it. I have no parents, but alternates cared for me and the many like myself who were abandoned or orphaned. None of the juveniles, including me, is allowed to go on the surface alone. We are told stories of scavengers who kidnap children and sell them, or worse.

One thing in particular worries me; this place was home to someone before our starship limped into the abandoned landing port long ago. The Elders say our colony is hidden, but where are the people who made this place? What if they decide to come back?

 
Colony Star IV, our quad-jump ship, searched for generations but never found a place that was safe to stay. Here on asteroid SRS-1 on the star charts, we discovered a network of tunnels and protection from the pirates. We were the last ship of twelve that departed together from our dying planet. Our ships could go no further by the time we arrived at this cluster of rocks, as our onboard systems were starting to fail. That log entry was signed by the ship's historian, dated just after the colony was established.



Image Credit*


I flipped the switch to the opposite side of the brass viewer relic I had found in the library. The light faded as the unit cooled. I disconnected the power source, as every bit of power was monitored for the general good. I wish I could see a place that had green stuff on the ground or creatures that followed humans around. But there was none here, and all I see in our history database are very old images.

I wish I had one of those things shaped like a sphere. On a planet, the historians say, these spheres would do a thing called bounce, but I have never seen anything bounce here. In all my ten seasons, never. What does bounce look like? I don't know what 'go out to play' means either. We stay in to do things, but we don't call it play. We call them challenges.

As I left the library viewing room, I heard someone call, "Wait up, Dak!"

I know that voice. He's the only person that agrees with my ideas. Both of us want to escape this place one day. First, we need a map. . .so we can decide where to go. Then, we need to hide aboard a seeker transport.

"Hi Rafe! I'm on my way to training duty for the next hour block. Meet you after at Central Mess?"

"You haven't heard the news then, have you?"

"What news?" My heart jumped.

****

To be continued, this snippet is part of the background of one of the characters in my SciFi novels. Hope it stirred your interest. . .

*Image Credit: Free use image.

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Would you like to challenge yourself? Try Write...Edit...Publish!

Join us for a monthly signup and some very interesting reading. It's flexible. I joined the once-a-month bloghop since it meets my needs. I've also met fellow bloggers with the same penchant for responding to Denise's challenges. WEP makes me practice short writing and has given me starter material for a few short stories.




Write…Edit…Publish! aka WEP welcomes you to submit any of the following – flash fiction, poetry, non-fiction or playscripts to a word count of 1,000 words – artwork and photographs accompanied by your written inspiration in creating your work/s.

Next Challenge: April Fool
Owner/Originator: Denise Covey at her website.


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Do you know about the WEP writing challenges? Do you think our experiences in childhood form part of our principles as adults? Can you remember when you first realized adults didn't know everything. . .?

Thanks for visiting, feedback is welcome but not required. Let me know you were here in the comments! Then, please visit the other participants on the list at the Denise Covey Blog.

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37 comments:

  1. Hello D.G. Awesome flash! Futuristic children! 'I don't know what go out to play means either.' Love it. And I'm waiting to hear the news, too...Let me know what you do with this story, D.G. It certainly has potential for a much longer piece.

    I'm glad you're finding WEP fulfilling. I always think that hey, I wouldn't have written that if not for the monthly challenge.

    Thanks for participating and spreading the word. Much appreciated.

    Denise

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    1. WEP makes me write things I might not have written, so it's a plus for me, too, Denise.

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  2. Even when this planet's dead, children will still face the same threats of violence and abuse - that is a seriously sobering thought.

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  3. This is an intriguing start to a story! I am definitely a sci-fi fan :)

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    1. I like to discover scifi fans, so that's good to know. This does have a bearing on one of the WIPs I'm working on.

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  4. Great intro to your young character. Not a pleasant world he's growing up in though.

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    1. No, it's a hard world, LG, perhaps similar to the setup Ender was in. Kids are treated as replacements to be groomed for the greater good.

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  5. It is a sobering thought. The main idea in this snippet is that kids are not treated 'like kids' too much. Everyone must contribute to the colony.

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    1. This reply is for Nilanjana Bose, Blogger is acting up.

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  6. Intriguing bit. And, yes, I think it hooks sufficiently that the reader wants to know more. Great job!

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    1. Thanks, Robin, I will be working more on this one.

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  7. HI, D.G.

    This is VERY Intriguing! I would definitely read more.
    LOVE the name DAK... My code name at Twitter. Also a featured captain of the Fairy guard in my first novel.

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    1. How about that, Michael! I'm not on Twitter, so I wouldn't have known. I was thinking that kids without parents would be named a simple name since parents, per se, may be a rare commodity in the future. Dak is a great name, I'm not surprised we both have arrived at it. I discarded a few before that too. . .interesting. I like fairies and Elven folk.

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  8. Yes, you peaked my interest! I like how you ended it with a hook. Very nice. Like to know what happens next!

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    1. Glad you liked it, Lisa! I may continue it on another WEP post. . .

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  9. Please do continue it on another WEP post! Loved the voice in your piece. And sadly, with all our couch potato children linked to the Net and their cell phones -- most of our present day children don't know what "go out to play" means either!

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    1. Outside, the world goes on. . . whether we participate or not.

      And, I will continue this story. Dak appears later in the story as a young man because of what he learns at this point as a ten year old.

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  10. I'd sneak off with you both to see where you end up. Awesome flash.

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    1. Sounds good to me. WIth all your Backworlds experience, I travel with you anyday, Mary.

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  11. Great story, I want to know what the news is. Looking forward to more at some point.

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    1. Thanks, Sally, I'll keep working on it.

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  12. PLease do write more about it, nice post !

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    1. Will do, or at least I'll try. Thanks for visiting.

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  13. No really, what news!? Great beginning.

    I've only done the WEP challenge once, but I'd like to participate more. I'll try to hit next month's.

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    1. It would be nice to see you there, Shannon. This month's prompt fit nicely into what I'm working on - a scifi wip.

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    1. I'm glad to hear that, Charmaine. Dak will be a player of some importance when he's a young man.

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  15. Replies
    1. Thanks, Michael. Side stories are helping me understand four new characters. I like reading these WEP posts too.

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  16. Well-written piece, DG -- I enjoyed stepping into this character's world. Our childhood experiences definitely shape our adult lives as well as our writing. Which is why I dabble in horror.

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    1. I still remember the first scifi book I read : Arthur C. Clarke's Childhood's End at age 17 or 18. The hook was set. I think S. King liked horror as a kid, too, so you're in good company, Milo. Thanks for the kind words,

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  17. I sure hope future generations will not have to live underground! Nice piece!

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    1. I don't even like being underground, Living always with artificial light would bring other problems, too.

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  18. Good story start! Getting left hanging was the real surprise.

    Not overly familiar with WEP. Heard of it, but I don't remember what I heard. Too much data flooding this old brain I guess.

    Lee
    Wrote By Rote
    An A to Z Co-host blog

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    1. Glad you liked it, Lee. I'm trying to enlarge my short story stock, and will pick up the threads on some of these starts as the year progresses. WEP works to get me started on those and it's only once a month.

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  19. Interest very much stirred. That description of not understanding play is really well done. Great voice.

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    1. Thanks, guys! Trying to think like a kid works very well. I had a brother and a sis that were younger than me.

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