Monday, October 20, 2014

SURVIVE and Thrive Blogfest - It's Your HEART!

Once again, Michael di Gesu, together with Stephen Tremp, our own Ninja Captain, Alex J. Cavanaugh, and the lovely L. Diane Wolfe join together for another very important blogfest  about HEALTH!




The Survive and Thrive Bloghop is meant to bring awareness of disease prevention and early detection regarding medical conditions that may be averted or treated if caught in the early stages. If you're just entering your forties, or even fifties in particular, you can make a difference in your own chances of beating illnesses by being aware and taking steps to prevent bad habits which will pay you back later in life.

Take a walk through a senior's care home or through the recovery-rehab unit in a hospital to see the effects of heart attacks, strokes, cancer and other degenerative diseases. It's an eye-opener and one we don't like to think about. It's up to us to stay out of those situations.


HEART HEALTHY

Prevention:

Eat heart healthy - lean meats, less fat and more olive oil, complex carbs, fruits and veggies

Walk, run or exercise in some manner. Get off your tush! BIC is good for writing, but not for health.

Get a checkup if Heart conditions or Heart attacks run in your family (tests specifically for the heart as well as associated tests)

If High cholesterol runs in your family, discuss the dangers and testing with your doctor, even if you're slim and appear healthy.
 
Tiredness can imply a warning: clogged arteries, anemic conditions, and others, so have a checkup with your doctor. A barrage of tests may be needed, but it's your life or that of a loved one at risk.
 

TIME Factors:

Time is essential if a heart attack occurs; you must have some idea of what to do. They can happen anytime, after a stressful situation or during peaceful sleep. Strokes, and heart attacks don't always give warning signs. Have you had any first aid training?

Will you know what to do and how fast you have to do it? My desire to know First Aid came from seeing hubs in a car accident when we were in our early thirties (I was 7 months pregnant at the time). A woman driver ran through a yellow light as it was turning red. I saw it happen as hubs was picking me up from work. The co-workers in the company I worked for were taking care of his bleeding from his head immediately after the accident occurred because they knew First Aid. I thanked each one of them individually after the accident.

After that, I wanted to be able to be competent if I ever was in a similar situation.  In addition, when I became a mother, I wanted to be know what to do if my kids were choking, or having other distress in the early years. I took several courses - basic first aid, lifesaving techniques, and baby CPR, and that knowledge helped when hubs had his heart attack this past summer. I knew what the term 'clear the airway' meant and how to do basic CPR when the 911 operator told me to do that. It is critical.

Ambulance Prioritization
I recently read a news article about the triage of ambulance prioritization of emergency calls in our local paper, The Vancouver Sun. The article says the ambulance response teams prioritize in order to help those first where time makes a large difference, such as cardiac arrests, respiratory collapse, etc. Time without oxygen will impact recovery and chances of survival. In these cases, speed is the essence that helps.
 
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It's your choice. Wouldn't you prefer to be prepared?
 
To read the other blogposts, click on the title: SURVIVE AND THRIVE

Thanks again to our hosts for organizing and promoting Good Health and Prevention!

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Have you had testing for various diseases: Diabetes, heart trouble, cancer, etc? Do you know first aid?

Please leave a comment to let me know you were here, and thanks for dropping by! I'll respond.

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43 comments:

  1. I always try to be cognizant of these warning signs. I have experienced a lot of fatigue lately so perhaps I need to get a checkup!

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    1. It's always good to be ahead of any problems OE! When fatigue happened to my carpool partner, it turned out to be that she had become anemic.

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  2. I admit I'm not good in a crisis situation at all. When my toilet overflowed once my reaction was to cry hysterically screaming WHY GOD WHY?! I didn't even know there was a shut off valve for the toilet (and me, a plumber's daughter!). All I know about CPR now is that they don't want you to stop to breathe into the person's mouth, just keep pumping to the beat of 'Stayin Alive'.

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    1. I'm good in a crisis situation, but I detest plumbing problems. I only know the basic of that too. But lifesaving techniques should be taught I the schools, too.

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  3. Glad someone was there to help your husband!
    I do know first aid although I probably need to brush up on it. And I get a physical every year now.
    Thanks for participating in the blogfest.

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    1. Well, Alex, the first someone was me, then the paramedics. The spouse should know some lifesaving techniques. We needed the equipment the paramedics had. It's a great idea to stay on top of checkups which we thought we were doing. I sent hubs to the doctor and we found out about other problems, but because he was slim all his life, and was active in sports earlier on, we didn't focus on the heart.

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  4. I've been certified in first aid and cpr for almost 40 years. Having children makes a knowledge of it a necessity.

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    1. Exactly, Susan. Bravo for your forethought.

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  5. I agree with everything you said about being heart healthy (as I have a heart condition), except for the the "less fat" part. Scientific study after study shows that fat has nothing to do with clogged arteries. It's inflammation. Highly processed sugars and omega-6 oils are major triggers for this kind of inflammation.

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    1. I hadn't heard about the sugars and oils you mention, but we should have been more aware. High cholesterol is a factor and runs in hubs' family. They attributed it to that in most of the info we received. We eat more lean meats, little beef, more lamb, and watched our sugar and salt intake, and used olive oil but hubs ate less healthy when he worked late shifts at his job. It was a stressful job as well. Thanks for the new info.

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  6. Heart problems don't run in my family, but that's probably because my family all runs (too cheesy?). We're big fans of exercise and eating healthy, and we're also big fans of the slim waists that come with it. Sure, writing doesn't require you to be slender and in shape, but I'd rather have as many years as possible to write.

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    1. Sounds good and waist measurement is important for both genders.

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  7. My wife and I take coursed in First Aid and keep our certificates up to date. I've save people choking because I know how to properly perform the Heimlich Maneuver. It pays to be prepared!

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  8. You bring up an excellent point. We can do a lot to help others during a crisis and while waiting for medics to arrive. I think we should all know more about first aid.

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  9. I D.G.

    Thanks so much for posting for this hop! It is SOOO true, I love your suggestion about knowing first aid and how to react during emergency situations. WE should ALL KNOW THIS! We can save a loved one's life. Or even a stranger who is in distress.

    Knowledge is POWER. And you are right about taking care of our hearts. The heart keeps us alive. Daily cardio exercise is a must....

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  10. I have taken first aid and believe it to be most helpful but I can't give the proper strength to a person if they need the first aid (pushing on the chest) and that frustrates me. Great pointers

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  11. We need some fat in our diets, but I still consume a low-fat diet because of the amount of calories in fat. If most of my food is carbs and protein, I can eat more.

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    1. I mainly try to eat healthy, as I'm sure you do.

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  12. My mother had heart surgery in 2009. If she'd put off her doctor visit she would have had a massive heart attack. She was 69 at the time. On the other hand, my son had a stroke this year at the age of 36. Did expect that one.

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    1. The hidden reasons are the ones which are sometimes hard to target: plaque in the arteries, etc.

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  13. I really do believe in healthy eating and exercise. My grandparents walked two miles every day, well into their eighties. Both lived until their late nineties and never needed assisted living until the last month of life. I have thyroid issues, but I don't let it stop me from exercising, especially with all the sitting I do the rest of the day. oi.

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    1. Good, it's great to know some elderly do survive and don't get dementia and other diseases.

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  14. Being prepared isn't just a motto for Girl & Boy Scouts. I can do what I need to do in an emergency. Once professional help arrives, I start shaking and fall apart. You do what you have to do.

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    1. That's me too, Diane. The after effects. . .

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  15. Hi D.G. This was very comprehensive. Seeing heart problems are one of the biggest killers it helps to be prepared. Time is certainly of the essence.

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  16. I've been first aid and CPR certified before, and will be renewing those soon (after a several year gap) to take care of my dad. I do still remember the basics, but CPR has changed since I was last certified, and I'd like to it refreshed, anyway. It's too important to know well. I'm so glad you knew how to help your husband!

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    1. When I have time, and hubs is more settled, I plan to do the same.

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  17. I apologize for not visiting and commenting in a timely manner. Hospital changes and appts related to that have come up unexpectedly. Will be around as soon as I can today or tomorrow. Thanks.

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  18. You've lived through some scary stuff. I guess "lived through" is the important thing. Lived and learned. We all could stand to be just a bit more prepared. You can't know too much.

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    1. Yes, hindsight isn't worth much, we need foresight.

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  19. Some good and timely advice. Unfortunately, I've recently been through more tests than I care to think about. At least I know what needs work and where I'm good. Knowing, at the very least, basic first aid is essential, IMO. You just never know when you might need it and it could make the dfference between life and death.

    I hope you husband keeps improving and the pressure of all this will ease up for the two of you.

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    1. Thanks, FAE, for the kind wishes. I think being prepared gives one a bit more confidence, so we don't fall apart.

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  20. Hi DG - yes I can see having kids makes absolute sense to understand more about general first aid, or more advanced if possible ...

    I'm becoming more aware as I get older and I'm on my own - so need to be prepared in case something happens.

    However for you - I certainly hope your hubs heals slowly and surely ... and that you can get some rest and have less stress ... never easy ...

    With thoughts - Hilary

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    1. Thanks Hilary, hubs has recently gone a step up in his treatment which is good news.

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  21. I always like to think everyone in my family is in excellent health, but still, like it or not, it's probably good to review all the precautions and ways to spot something in progress. Thanks for being my headed-into-winter reminder!

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    1. We need reminders every now and then, and should share what we learn so others can avoid the trauma.

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  22. I've never had a test for my heart...and always like to think that it's in good condition. But how do I know for sure? The thing is, I tend to be one of those ‘I-refuse-to-be-sick’ people…not in a 'know-it-all' kind of way. I just hate that 'down-and-out' feeling...
    A thorough annual medical check-up is good. I'm due for one.

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  23. Hi DG .. glad to read your news over at Inger's ... take care and as you say cooking is therapeutic ... all the very best - and cheers Hilary

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