Sunday, May 19, 2013

The Book, by Jessica Bell - A Review

A child's viewpoint is simple, unfettered and direct. . .if something causes pain, then you cast it out. Bonnie, at five years, senses much more than her parents know. She hears, she sees and watches the adults each in their own worlds, and wonders at what she doesn't understand.


Cover of The Book by Jessica Bell


Initially, the book comes into being as a journal for the young child, an attempt to tell the child about her parents, who both write in it. It evolves into a entirely different creature, spawning emotions from all who touch it. In a split family, we watch a child in distress, intelligent beyond her years in the ways of adults and how they say one thing and do another. She's not sure who to trust, since she loves them all. But not the book, never the book.



It's coming - The Book Blog Tour by Expresso June 2013


Bonnie resists, in every way she can. She knows adults can be fooled. She reaches out to the adults, but withdraws when they don't measure up. An engaging story, The Book should be read by anyone who deals with children, but especially parents. It's important to recognize the intellectual jumps some children can make by observing those closest to them.  In Bonnie's mind, The Book is the cause of the discord wrecking her family.

When families break apart, it's not easy to pick up the pieces. Four different people, each with a different yearning. I finished my review copy of The Book today, and by the last page, my emotions were in turmoil. You have to read it to find out why. This is a book that will grip your heart and not let go. Bravo, Jessica, I felt this one in my core.
Highly recommended.

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Author Jessica Bell


Jessica Bell, Author of The Book


An Australian-native, the smiling beauty in the photo currently resides in Athens, Greece. She is a contemporary fiction author, poet and sing/songwriter/guitarist, whose literary inspiration often stems from songs she's written. Jessica is the Co-Publishing Editor of Vine Leaves Literary Journal and runs the Homeric Retreat and Workshop on the the Greek Island of Ithaca.

For more information, please visit her website: www.jessicabellauthor.com



If you don't currently follow Jessica's Blog, The Alliterative Allomorph, give it a preview. She features The Artist Unleashed-a series of guest posts, news about the self-publishing world, and what to do or what to avoid, when submitting to Vine Leaves Literary Journal.

For information about The Book Blog Tour in June and to see the trailer, visit Jessica's site. Jessica's books can be found on Amazon US, Amazon UK, Kobo, and Goodreads.

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Are you familiar with Jessica Bell's writing? Own any of her other books? Are you intrigued by the viewpoint of a small child?
Please leave a comment, I'm interested in what you have to say, and thanks for dropping by.

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References:

http://www.jessicabellauthor.com/ The Author, Jessica Bell website

http://thealliterativeallomorph.blogspot.gr/ The Alliterative Allomorph Blog

http://www.jessicabellauthor.com/books.html  Books by the Author


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40 comments:

  1. Thank you so much for this lovely review! It means the world to me!!!

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    1. That's some book, Jessica. And it was my pleasure. I wish you much success with this one!

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  2. Children can be more complex than adults give them credit for. They also understand more than they can express, because comprehension outpaces vocabulary to some degree. Sound like a very good read, I need to get it in queue!

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    1. Children can teach us some things, too, if we only pay attention. I learned about that in my twenties, when I worked one summer with pre-schoolers (3-5yr olds). Thanks for visiting, Rick. Long time, no see.

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    2. That's exactly what I tried to portray in this book, Rick. Thanks for your interest and for dropping by!

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  3. I do enjoy books that leave me in emotional turmoil. Geeky that way. :P

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    1. This one caught me off guard, LG. It's really a grabber.

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    2. Hehe, I love books like that too. What is it they they say? Write what you want to read? :-)

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  4. Jessica's book is definitely unique!

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    1. It is, and addresses a problem that occurs when families are in distress.

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  5. Sounds really interesting. It's true, kids have a completely different way of viewing the world than adults.

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    1. I've managed a preschooler program on a grant for a summer session-years ago, MJ. I learned a lot about kids and how they think that summer. Too many adults talk around the 5 yrs and under, or about them to another adult. Jessica has captured that in her story.

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    2. I think I actually learned some things about kids myself when writing this book. It also started triggering some flashbacks of my own of times when I thought my parents were just totally stupid. It was probably about something trivial and benign.

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  6. I enjoyed Jessica's String Bridge. She's a great writer.

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    1. I've read a couple of her other books, but not that one, yet, Mary. I liked this one a lot. It does what a book is supposed to do.

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  7. What a great review. Kids really are more perceptive than we give them credit for. I have a 4 year old and a 7 year old and they never cease to surprise me. I've got Jessica's book on my tbr list! (:

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    1. Kids make us take ourselves less seriously, at least mine did. Guidance is so important at this age - the developmental years. But you know that, living with a 3 and a 7 yr old!

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    2. Thanks, Elise! Looking forward to hearing what you think! Because I don't actually have kids. So I even surprised myself when writing this book. I often wonder whether I was possessed by a child spirit ... dun dun ...

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    3. I agree DG, guidance is so important, especially in the early years. I just hope I'm not doing it all worng, lol! And you're welcome Jessica. Would be great if I could channel my character's spirit to write my book . . . (:

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  8. Jessica's novel sounds different. My kinda different. I wish her well.

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    1. Thanks, Wendy, it is different, the kind that stuns you.

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  9. This was awfully nice of you to post, D.G.

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    1. It was my pleasure to help out a fellow blogger. Jessica's writing hits home.

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    2. Yes, it was! D.G is a fabulous supporter.

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  10. Jessica, whether as a poet or novelist, writes from the heart to the heart. Her words always make you think beneath the surface, listening to the echoes of your own hurts. You did a fine review D.G. People who buy THE BOOK will be haunted by it long after they put the book down.

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    1. That's an excellent assessment, Roland, and glad you liked the review. I've read her poetry and you're right, she makes you think. . Glad you could drop by.

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    2. Thank you so much, Roland. Your kind words mean the world!

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  11. What a great review of an interesting sounding book. I have made a note of it and will go and visit Jessica's website.

    Also, thank you for visiting Hayley. I would be so happy if I helped connect Hayley and your daughter across the big pond. Sometimes blogging can be so great.

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    1. Hope you can check out Jessica's website, it's an interesting place. I gave our daughter the link, so who knows? You have such a generous heart, Inger.

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  12. That sounds like a wonderful book!

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  13. Ooh,this sounds like a really intriguing read - I'm almost scared to read it though as it's sure to make me think about all the ways I've probably messed up my kids!

    I've had Jessica's String Bridge for a long time and it's finally near the top of my to-read list. Can't wait!

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    1. This is how it looks from the child's eyes. It shows what's important to a child caught in the middle.

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  14. This sounds like a fascinating premise for any book. I think we all have a damaged inner child whose stories need to be told; the question is, are we brave enough to tell them?
    In Medias Res

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    1. Very good question, Milo. I'm not ready yet.

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  15. I'm definitely intrigued by the viewpoint of a child character. Kids see so much more than we think they do. They absorb it all in, and while they're smarter than we often give them credit for, they color their translation of what occurs by their understanding of the world.

    Shannon at The Warrior Muse

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