Tuesday, April 17, 2012

O = Opera Garnier (Opéra de Paris) A to Z

Remember the setting for the Phantom of the Opera?
This is it. . .


Opéra Garnier, Paris, France - by DG Hudson

Opéra Garnier


This theatre is also called the Opéra de Paris or simply the Opéra.  It was the primary home of the Paris Opera and the Paris Opera Ballet until 1989, when a new 2,700-seat house, the Opéra Bastille, with elaborate facilities for set and production changes, opened at the Place de la Bastille.  Opera Garnier is now used mainly for ballet. 

I learned too late about the Opera Garnier tours from a fellow traveler, so my photos are of the building exterior only.  I'm not sure if they permit photography inside the Opera.  It's another central location to plan your walks from, as the Hop-On Hop Off Bus and other tour buses frequent this area. 




Opera Garnier Roof Detail with Gilt - by DG Hudson



The Palais Garnier / Opera Garnier is probably the most famous opera house in the world, a symbol of Paris.  This is at least partly due to its use as the setting for Gaston Leroux's 1911 novel, The Phantom of the Opera, and the novel's more recent adaptations.  Among the buildings constructed in Paris during the Second Empire, the Opera Garnier was the most expensive, and the only one considered a masterpiece.




Composers, Musicians decorate the Opera Garnier by DG Hudson


Gilding seems appropriate on such a grand building used for the performing arts.  On a sunny day, this building shines golden.

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Have you seen the Phantom of the Opera?  The Opera Garnier?  Please share in the comments.  Or, do you prefer the movies to live theatre?


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References:

http://www.operadeparis.fr/en/L_Opera/Palais_Garnier/PalaisGarnier.php
Home page - Opera Garnier
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palais_Garnier Palais Garnier

18 comments:

  1. Does it have an underground lake, like in the story?

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    1. Yes Rick, it did! Nice to know it's a fact.
      A View on Cities-
      http://www.aviewoncities.com/paris/operagarnier.htm

      "Construction of the opera building started in 1862, but it wasn't completed until 1875, partly because an underground lake was discovered during Palais Garnier
      construction. The small lake still exists under the opera building. It was the hiding place of the 'Phantom of the Opera' in Paul Leroux's famous play."

      Thanks for asking, Rick, I forgot to include that bit.

      Delete
  2. Love the Paris photos! I was there 20 years ago for a weekend, so I can't really say I know the place. I'm going back with my family in June for five days. I'm really looking forward to it! Any suggestions for what to see with a curious and energetic six-year-old boy?

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    1. Sean, thanks for the follow, and I found a couple of links you can check re activities for young kids.

      Re-Paris
      http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2009/04/ten-great-things-to-do-with-kids/

      40 things to do with kids
      http://www.deliciousbaby.com/travel/france/paris/

      I think the Pompidou Centre (modern art) is supposed to have a play park as well for kids. Not sure if age-appropriate though.

      June should be a great month to be there.

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    2. Thanks! June will have beautiful weather but too many crowds. It's a trade-off.

      Delete
  3. I have never seen it, but I did read Leroux's tale and enjoyed it. Would love to see it preformed live.

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    Replies
    1. I haven't seen the play either Mina, but I definitely want to see the Opera House when I go back!

      I'd like to read the old original tale, too.

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  4. Hi DG .. so much refurbishment has gone on - we were taken by my French penfriend's family - to see something .. they thought my understanding was good - because I'd been reading the Angelique books (that age!) .. !!

    It looks beautiful .. and I'd love to visit both theatres .. I saw Phantom here in London - great show with beautiful music ...

    Hope this comment gets through - love your tour .. cheers Hilary

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    Replies
    1. Lucky you, Hilary! To see the play in London would be great.

      I'm enjoying your castle series, too. I like to learn about different places. Thanks for being persistent.

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  5. my daughter danced to this wonderful music in one of her dance recitals--beautiful

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    Replies
    1. In ballet? What a great idea. I love dance too. Some operas have very moving music and tragic tales.

      Thanks for stopping by.

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  6. Next time you'll have to take the tour!

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    1. For sure, Alex! We will, as that traveler told me the inside is phenomenal, murals, etc.

      I've already started my list for the next trip.

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  7. Beautiful architcure. I would love to visit all of Paris.

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    1. You would love it, Bethie, but vicariously is second best. I still like cruising Paris web pages and watching Midnight in Paris was like a refresher, since it covered some of the area where we stayed.

      Thanks for stopping by.

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  8. I have not seen Phantom of the Opera, but feel like I should, for the classic it is. Of course, if I were to see it and love, I would definitely feel drawn to see the place of its setting, because I like things like that - making connections, immersing in history.

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    Replies
    1. I agree, J. I love those kinds of connections, too. That's why I love knowing the 'behind the scene' details.

      Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  9. Welcome Holly, thanks for following. I checked out your twitter page but I don't currently use that media. Nice to meet you.

    ReplyDelete

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