Thursday, April 2, 2015

B = Bistros and Baguettes, French Faves, A to Z Blog Challenge

To live, one must eat, and what better place than Paris? In a bistro, with a baguette on the side. . .?


Bistro Marguerite, near the Hotel de Ville, Paris, by DG Hudson


B = Bistros


In Paris and other cities, a Bistro is a small restaurant serving moderately priced simple meals in a modest setting. Bistros are defined mostly by the foods they serve: French home-style cooking, and slow-cooked foods with lots of flavour.


Bistro Marguerite

Situated on the Right Bank across from the Hotel de Ville, Bistro Marguerite hugs the corner. With a view of the Seine River this bistro is great for people-watching and tasting some of the best French dishes we had ever had. The waiters are friendly and helpful, bringing us back multiple times. Not suitable for vegetarians or vegans --the bistro logo is a bull, after all. Good eating is celebrated here.

Examples: Baked cod dish, French style, with caramelized onions, and potatoes, also grilled salmon, fat juicy sausage, even steak and frites. Also French onion soup, fresh local veggies and more.


A little flash fiction mentioning this bistro

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Le Voltaire Restaurante - Left Bank, by DG Hudson


Le Voltaire

A real old world atmosphere. Voltaire used to hang around here. That's per the plaque on the building in the photo above. We were there for lunch so meal cost about 50 Euros. Use what French you know for better service, it helps as they get lots of tourists in this area. We had great food. Suggested by the Madame Hostess:  German beer, Quiche and salad, and raisin pie. 

Here are two short fiction pieces using this restaurant as a setting:

Flash Fiction and

Resistance is Futile


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B = Baguette

A baguette is "a long thin loaf" of French Bread that is commonly made from basic lean dough, which is defined by French law. It is distinguishable by its length and crisp crust.


French Baguette - Crusty with a light interior, Creative Commons*

The word 'baguette' was not used to refer to this type of bread until 1920, but what is now known as a baguette may have existed well before that. The word in its simple form means 'wand' or 'baton'. The traditional loaf is made from wheat flour, water, yeast and common salt. We bought one each day that we spent in Paris, in the Marais, from a boulangerie nearby. That crusty bread is habit-forming. . .


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Do you like baguettes, the French crusty type? How about bistros? Do you like the smell of warm bread?

Please leave a comment to let me know you stopped by, and if you are part of the A to Z Challenge. I'll be sure to check your blog, and reciprocate. If you're not in the challenge, thanks for stopping by to visit! I try to reply to all comments.

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The A to Z Blog Challenge is brainchild of Lee, at Tossing It Out.  Please visit the A to Z blog site to find out more information and the participant list.  There are also Twitter and Facebook presences if you want to check those!




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References:

http://dghudson-rainwriting.blogspot.ca/2014/08/taking-chances-wep-in-little-cafe.html Short fiction: Taking Chances

http://dghudson-rainwriting.blogspot.ca/2013/08/paris-cafe-pages.html The Cafe Pages

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baguette Wiki

http://dghudson-rainwriting.blogspot.ca/2011/02/immerse-yourself-in-moment.html A Tour of Paris via the 5 Senses.

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* Creative Commons Image Credit: French Baguette
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled GNU Free Documentation License.

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36 comments:

  1. Hmmm, there's nothing quite like ripping off a piece of fresh, hot baguette :-)

    Annalisa at Wake Up, Eat, Write, Sleep

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    1. You are so right! I searched for a similar bread when we got home to Vancouver, and found one that was close to the same recipe. . .

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  2. Hi D.G.

    I simply love the smell of fresh baked loaves! Once upon a time my mum used to bake bread at home, because she couldn't buy it. Nothing as comforting-heady as that aroma.

    The word 'baguette' is used very loosely where I am at, more referring to the shape than actual French style of baking it.

    I remember the flash fiction pieces you did very well, all great reads, those and this post.

    Best always,
    Nila.
    Madly-in-Verse

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    1. I used to make bread too, but it would disappear so fast that I thought all that effort not worth it. (those around me gobbled it up so fast) Thanks for the comments about the fiction pieces.

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  3. Hi DG - I used to eat in a lot of bistros - simple, very tasty fare .. usually in Londres, or Suid Afrika!!! Both bistros sound very enticing .. I love baguettes .. sadly it doesn't like me - so I guzzle it occasionally - the rest of the time I try and steer clear - thankfully I live in the UK and not France.

    Now it's nearly lunchtime - always a salad for me though .. cheers Hilary

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    1. A salad is usually my choice too, Hilary. I like my greens. But I do love baguettes. It's hard to find authentic ones here at home.

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  4. I just love bread and butter!!!! I don't allow myself to buy it b/c I could easily kill a baguette, or loaf of Italian, in a day.

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    1. I know what you mean, JoJo, it takes control. I like cornbread too, but have to eat that only occasionally.

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  5. I'm pretty sure I'm supposed to be living in France. :)

    I read your Flash Fiction. Love it. It makes you think....

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    1. I think I should be living there too, Maybe I'll win a a lotto. . .

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  6. First, I love the idea of sitting at a bistro and just soaking up the atmosphere of the community. I also like the simpler foods (with the lower price tag, I think... how much is 50 euros in dollars????). I've always thought frequenting places like this is good stimulus for that creative side of our brains. What better inspiration do we get than by watching people and letting ideas germinate???

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    1. The value of the Euro changes, but when we were there one Euro = 2-3 dollars Cdn. And that price 50 Euros - was for two people. Cafe sitting is a venerable pastime that has been lost in our countries. . .the owners and waiters here like to hustle patrons out.

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  7. I don't think people have really tried baguettes until they've gone to France. :) (Julia Child's recipe comes quite close!) Thanks for the recommendations on which bistros to go to. I'm going to Paris in early 2016, so I'm going to be following your blog intently throughout April A-Z. :)

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    1. Great, Mandy, Wish I were going in 2016! I've also written more under the two tabs at the top of my blog: Paris Posts and Paris, Etc. Two books we read: Paris was Ours and The Greater Journey all about Paris' history.

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  8. Having just been released from the hospital this article was agony. I loved it. Wonderful imagery in the descriptions. Greatly enjoyed.

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  9. Nothing better than the smell of warm bread. Yum. I would love to eat at a bistro in Paris. One of these days I'll make it.

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    Replies
    1. That's right, think positive and it will happen, or something like that.

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  10. HI, DG.

    Love your theme.LOVE PARIS.... and I adore bistros and baguettes!

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    Replies
    1. A kindred soul, then. I also like Florida! So much history there, but watch out for the small towns.

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  11. Don't try to be on a diet in Paris, right? :-)

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    1. It doesn't matter if you walk a lot, as most Parisians do. We walked everywhere even up hills in Montmartre.

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  12. I do like baguettes! We eat that type of bread with our pasta all the time.

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    1. Good to know, it's the crusty part that makes it so good! Just reheat them slightly.

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  13. Mmmmm…I could get on board with eating in little French Bistros for a week or two. :)

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    1. It was fun to walk until we saw an interesting bistro, in September we never made a reservation but always got in. Just lucky maybe. You would love it, LG.

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  14. Ah a francophile, I've been to Paris once. I would love to live a year in different countries. Just absorb the culture and people. I'm sure I am a direct descendent of Marco Polo. ;=)

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    1. I confess, yes. Paris got into my blood. If you do start travelling like Marco did, be sure to write about it.

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  15. I shouldn't have read this at 8PM. Now I'm hungry. :) Oh, to be a billionaire and fly to Paris for a little snack.

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    1. Wouldn't it be nice to be able to do that? I'd want to stay for a bit, though.

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  16. A bistro sounds good right now, and that baguette looks amazing! Clearly I'm ready for dinner right about now. :-D

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    1. Nice to meet you, but I couldn't see where to comment on your web page, and I don't do the other media. Let me know if there's another link.

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  17. Mmmm! Baguettes! Love 'em. They make good ones at my local supermarket and actually the Walmart across from my house sells a great tasting crusty one for $1 per loaf. Don't know if they have a lot of additives or anything and I'm sure they probably are as good as what you'd get at a real French bakery, but they work for me. My wife couldn't believe I'd gotten them at Walmart for $1. Now I want one again.

    Arlee Bird
    A to Z Challenge Co-host
    Tossing It Out

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  18. Hey DG. That close up of a baguette had me drooling. Nothing like being in Paris and buying fresh-baked baguettes 3 times a day! Ooh la la!

    I remember your flash fiction! I love writing about places to eat in Paris.

    Denise :-)

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  19. Your picture of the Bistro Marguerite is marvelous. It looks so warm and inviting. I love little bistros and baguettes. I am vegetarian but I do eat fish and the French seem to also, so I'm sure I could find something wonderful on the menu. Unfortunately, I can no longer eat grains, so I would have to pass on the baguette.

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    1. We loved that bistro, and it was close to where we stayed. Too bad about the allergy. We eat a lot of fish as well, and we eat minimal grains. Good baguettes are hard to find here in Vancouver anyway. . .

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