Saturday, April 4, 2015

D = D'Artagnan, French Faves - A to Z Challenge 2015

All for one, one for all
(tous pour un, un pour tous


D'Artagnan isn't one of the Three Musketeers, but they were his friends, Athos, Porthos and Aramis. That's the motto above, which was first put forth by D'Artagnan, in the famous story written by Alexandre Dumas.


Statue of D'Artagnan, a nod to the story, The Three Musketeers, by Dumas - WC

D = D'Artagnan

Charles Ogier de Batz de Castelmore, Comte d'Artagnan (c. 1611 - June 25, 1673) served Louis XIV* (see below) as captain of the Musketeers* of the Guard and died at the Siege of Maastricht. A fictionalized account of his life written by Gatien de Courtilz de Sandras, formed the core of the d'Artagnan Romances, including The Three Musketeers, written by Alexandre Dumas.

D'Artagnan is portrayed as a hotheaded youth in the story, who quickly becomes friends with the Musketeers after trying to engage all three in single combat. His literary enemy is Cardinal Richelieu in the Dumas tale. Charles de Batz, whom the character d'Artagnan was based on, went to Paris in the 1630s and used the surname of his mother, Francoise de Montesquiou d'Artagnan. 


D'Artagnan was famous for his part in the arrest of Nicolas Fouquet, Louis XIV's finance commissioner who wanted to be the King's advisor. His love of grand architecture caused his downfall when the magnificence of his palace (the Chateau Vaux-le-Vicomte) made Louis feel upstaged and left him wondering whence the money came. . . shortly after, Fouquet was arrested. In 1667, d'Artagnan became captain-lieutenant of the Musketeers.

It's always interesting to know a little history behind the story.

* (See more about the Sun King and The Musketeers later in French Faves A to Z)

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Do you know the story of Dumas'  D'Artagnan? Did you like the film The Three Musketeers (in any of its reincarnations)?

Please leave a comment to let me know you stopped by, and if you are part of the A to Z Challenge. I'll be sure to check your blog, and reciprocate. If you're not in the challenge, thanks for stopping by to visit! I try to reply to all comments.

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The A to Z Blog Challenge is brainchild of Lee, at Tossing It Out.  Please visit the A to Z blog site to find out more information and the participant list.  There are also Twitter and Facebook presences if you want to check those!





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Image Credit: D'Artagnan character

Statue des d'Artagnan, by von Gustave Doré, Bronze, 1883, Place du Général Catroux, Paris 17. Arrdt.

I, Jibi44, the copyright holder of this work, hereby publishes it under the following licenses:

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled GNU Free Documentation License


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References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_de_Batz-Castelmore_d'Artagnan

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Three_Musketeers

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24 comments:

  1. An interesting background to the famous stories. I didn't see the films, but, of course, I read Dumas' book when I was young.

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    1. You are probably one of the few who have read his book, Inger, I have not and may want to remedy that. I knew about the musketeers, though not so much about d'Artagnon prior to this research.

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  2. This has been an education, D.G. Thanks

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    1. My pleasure, JL, I couldn't resist using that statue, he looks so dashing!

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  3. The sculpture is magnificent! Power, pride, even arrogance all in one figure.

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    1. That is probably why I like it, and it may have been a matter of pride with the real d'Artagnan that his mother had a good background that opened doors.

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  4. I didn't know his full story.
    Not sure which movie version is my favorite. There have been so many.

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    1. I liked the version with Oliver Reed and Richard Chamberlain. Michael York may have played d'Artagnon in that version. It was great with lots of swordplay.

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  5. I never knew who authored the book. I have heard of Dumas but never read any of his stuff. There was a 3 musketeers cartoon as part of the Banana Splits show that I saw but I can't say that it interested me enough to ever pursue any other tellings of it.

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    1. Now that I know the story is based on a real life person, I want to read it. I like books of that time period. I remember the Banana Splits, too.

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  6. I never knew the story behind Dumas' D'Artagnan. I love all of the remakes for The Three Musketeers. :)

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    1. I do too, Chrys, like the Arthurian legends, I never tire of a good story with swashbuckling action.

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  7. So glad to be back to your blog DG! I love the Musketeer stories and love your theme this year. I didn't know the history you relate here, but have been close to the region he where he was from. I want to see that statue! Thanks for dropping by my blog and commenting! Lisa, co-host AtoZ 2015, @ http://www.lisabuiecollard.com

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    1. If you see that statue take a photo. It looks magnificent and the attitude depicted suits what I'd expect of someone in the King's Guard. Glad to see you dropping by, Lisa!

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  8. Hi DG - I vaguely knew of the story line and that Dumas wrote the book ... we've got a tv series going on at the moment - all sword swashbuckling ... I rarely watch. But I did love early versions ... when I had less to do I guess and could dream of handsome lovers perhaps ... !!

    Cheers Hilary

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    1. Didn't we all dream of those gallant men? I wanted to take fencing while in college but didn't. Took modern dance instead. . .

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  9. I have read Dumas and although he's very wordy I do enjoy his stories. I did not know that D'Artshnan was based on a real person. Thanks for the knowledge without the calories.

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    1. Don't worry, I've got a variety pack in the French Faves. Thanks for checking the back posts, too!

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  10. I read the Dumas version a long, long time ago in high school and barely remember it. I do remember it was a little more boring than I had been expecting... but perhaps that was the kid in me. Also, I had no idea D'Artagnan was based on a real person.

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    1. You have to remember what reading was like in Dumas' time, and consider the action that was changed in the movie versions. I liked the idea that the stories were based on a real person, too!

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  11. I also didn't realize that D'Artagnan was based on a real person. That interesting fact really makes the story come to life.

    Julie

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    1. I thought so too. Isn't history interesting if you find out these facts?

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  12. How did I miss this one?! :(

    I have seen two versions of the film, actually three, if I count the Tom and Jerry cartoon version.

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    1. I'm glad you could backtrack to find this post, Nila,! I didn't see the cartoon version, but if it's like Puss N Boots with Banderas, it would be fun to watch. Recently watch Zorro with him as the lead and I do like watching sword fights. . .such fancy footwork. . .

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