Wednesday, April 9, 2014

H = Henri Matisse, - A to Z Blog Challenge

ART: Artists, Art Trivia, Art Legends
 
A glimpse of the ART world, in the manner of an alphabetical mini-art tour. ART focuses on artists and art movements between the 1850's-1960's. There are exceptions.
 

 
Henri Matisse, Artist, 1933, by Carl Van Vechten ,(WC)


H = Henri Matisse
1869 = 1954


Henri-Émile-Benoît Matisse, a Fauvist painter who endured condemnation and criticism to find his way in the art world of Paris. A French artist known for his 'draughtsmanship', he was also a printmaker and sculptor. His conservative appearance and his dedicated work habits did not fit in with those of his artist friends.

In 1898, he took the advice of Camille Pissarro and went to London to study the painting style of J.M.W. Turner, but Matisse found his inspiration in Cezanne's sense of structure and color. He purchased many works from his fellow artists on his return. In his home, he displayed a plaster bust by Rodin, a painting by Gauguin, a Van Gogh drawing, and Cezanne's 'Three Bathers'.

Matisse and a group of artists known as 'Fauves' exhibited together in 1905. In 1906, Henri met Pablo Picasso for the first time, a brooding dark-eyed artist 11 years younger than himself. They met at Gertrude Stein's Paris salon. Gertrude, her brothers Leo Stein, Michael Stein and wife Sarah, all became important collectors and supporters of Matisse's paintings. Picasso and Matisse became lifelong friends and rivals.

In 1907, Guillaume Apollinaire commented about Matisse in an article published in La Falange, calling Matisse's art 'eminently reasonable'. Yet, when Matisse showed Woman with the Hat at the Paris Salon, it received harsh criticism.

. . .'When the painting that was singled out for special condemnation, Matisse's Woman with a Hat, was brought by Gertrude and Leo Stein. . ." (Wiki)

Gertrude Stein purchased the painting and hung it in her apartment thus ending the public discussion of its worth. She continued to collect Picasso and Matisse over many other artists who attended her Paris social gatherings.

During the period between 1906 and 1917, Henri Matisse was an active part of the art and creative talent gathering in the Montparnasse district of Paris. He died of a heart attack in 1954 at the age of 84, and is interred in a cemetery in Cimiez, near Nice, France.

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Fauvism style has been described as 'expressing emotion with wild, often dissonant (clashing) colors, without regard for the subject's natural colors'

Images of Paintings

In respect of the artist's copyright which expires in 2024, I'm linking to the paintings below. It's worth a click or two, if only to see the lush color.

IMAGE links:

Woman-with-a-Hat
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Matisse-Woman-with-a-Hat.jpg

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Portrait of Madame Matisse.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Matisse_-_Green_Line.jpeg Another favorite
 
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Do you know of Henri Matisse's work as one of the leaders of the Fauvists? What do you think of the preference for color importance over realism?

Please share your thoughts in the comments and thanks for dropping by! I'll respond.

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Brought to you by the A to Z Blog Challenge 2014 Team and the originator: Lee of Tossing it Out. Click the A to Z list of participants and read on. Hope to see you again throughout the blogfest.



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References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_Matisse wiki Henri Matisse

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Image Credit:

Image of Matisse by Photographer: Carl Van Vechten
This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons
As the restrictions on this collection expired in 1986, the Library of Congress believes this image is in the public domain.
 However, the Carl Van Vechten estate has asked that use of Van Vechten's photographs "preserve the integrity" of his work, i.e, that photographs not be colorized or cropped, and that proper credit is given to the photographer.

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15 comments:

  1. Oh I love Matisse's work. Your theme is bringing back memories of the Art History class I took MANY years ago when I was in college. :)

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    1. If it's interesting, that's a good thing, Julie. I just wish I could include the painting images.

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  2. I like the Woman With The Hat. The colors are bold and lavish. The painting feels rich. Now.. Madame Matisse is a singularly ugly woman. In fact, she looks very much like a he. Change the hair and that IS a man. Poor Madame Matisse....

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    1. Art is subjective, and I like the Woman with the Hat better, too. Fauvism didn't try to flatter, but to study the color in the image.

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  3. What excellent colors in those paintings. I should check out more of Matisse's work. :)

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    1. The color is the important feature in Fauvism, and Matisse does it well.

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  4. Matisse's work is stunning in its perspective and colors. Perhaps not being able to show the paintings will lead others to find them on the net and expand Matisse's influence. :-)

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    1. Perhaps, Roland, if they are interested. The more recent artists in the latter part of the 20th century have many restrictions on them, as the copyright grace period hasn't expired.

      So many artists, like writers, were under-appreciated in their prime.

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  5. I like his work too ~ the colors are gorgeous. Reading your Art posts, I am missing living in L.A. and all the museums I was surrounded by, both at home and at work. Mr. Hammer was so good to build a museum right by our office, then there was the art on campus, and the Getty Center. At home, the LA County Museum was close by. But we have galleries here, I should not complain, but go take a look. Great post, D. G.

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    1. Some university campuses have excellent galleries. I hardly go to the Vancouver art gallery anymore, too expensive.

      I used to go at lunchtime and a few times a week when ever the show changed. It was cheaper in Paris at the Louvre and there's much more to see.

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  6. We have a few prints of Matisse's work in our home. He does use colors well.

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    1. How interesting Sherry, I have prints of Renoir and Monet, but none of the Fauvists. I'm impressed.

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  7. I'm really enjoying the "behind the scenes" facts you're showcasing in these posts, D.G.

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    1. Research is what I do for much of the who influenced who information. By learning about the artist and what he faced, it gives a greater depth to what he created.

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    2. SO true. That's why your posts are so interesting!

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