Saturday, April 26, 2014

W = Warhol, Andy - A to Z Blog Challenge


ART: Artists, Art Trivia, Art Legends


!POP ART!
1960s New York



W = Warhol, Andy
1928 - 1987


New York Pop artist and illustrator, Andy Warhol, was born on August 6, 1928 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  Check links below for more information


Warhol was an American artist and a leading figure in the visual art movement called pop art. His works explore the relationship between artistic expression, celebrity culture, and advertisement of the 1960s. After a successful career as a commercial illustrator, Warhol became a renowned artist. The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh holds an extensive collection of art and archives, and is the largest museum in the US dedicated to a single artist.


Warhol's art encompassed many forms of media, including hand drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, silk screening, sculpture, film, and music. He was also a pioneer in computer-generated art. He founded Interview Magazine, and  is the author of several books, including The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, and Popism: The Warhol Sixties.
 

Warhol's studio, The Factory ,was a famous gathering place for distinguished intellectuals, drag queens, playwrights, Bohemian street people, Hollywood celebrities, and wealthy patrons. Musicians and artists such as Lou Reed, Bob Dylan, Mick Jagger, and Truman Capote were regulars, but Salvador Dali and Allen Ginsberg came less frequently.

"Walk on the Wild Side", Lou Reed's best known solo song, was released on Transformer, 1972, and referred to the superstars and life at The Factory. During the 1960s, Warhol began his paintings of iconic American objects. These included: dollar bills, Campbell's Soup Cans, Marilyn Monroe, Elvis, Brando, and others. He groomed a retinue of bohemian and counterculture eccentrics, which he called Superstars.  These films were frequently shown in underground movie theatres.

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Are you aware of Andy Warhol's art works? Do you like Warhol's version of POP Art? Have you heard about his studio and The Factory?

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Please let me know you were here by leaving a comment, and thanks for stopping by! I'll respond. NOTE: Restrictions on photographs of Warhol and Warhol's art works prevent their use in this post.


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References and Links


http://www.warhol.org/  Andy Warhol museum

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Factory The Factory, Warhol's studio

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Brought to you by the A to Z Blog Challenge 2014 Team and the originator: Lee of Tossing it Out. Click the A to Z list of participants and read on. Hope to see you again throughout the blogfest.

 

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28 comments:

  1. yes I have heard a few stories of warhol and the factory but got a bit more of his flavour from this post. mostly I associated him with pop art not realising his other arty expressions .
    so thanks
    Sandra

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    1. Sixties artists were media hungry, and film was the one to play with. Not all these artists are faves, but they made an impact on art.

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  2. Not a fan at all. I love the 60s but I've come to realize that I prefer the sunny, psychedelic California scene over the dark, heroin-chic New York scene. Some of Warhol's Factory members were featured in that trippy party scene in 'Midnight Cowboy'.

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  3. I clicked the link for The Factory. I suppose this says more about me than about Andy Warhol, but I wasn't aware of his films. Based on the names of many of these (and Wiki confirms), many of these were porn films as much as anything.

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    1. That's a good assessment, Robin, and I think shock value was the desired result.

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  4. I had to smile at your questions this time, D.G., because I realize that there must be people out there who never heard of any of the goings on in NYC back in the 1960s. I lived in NJ but often went to the NYC and of course, Andy was a huge influence on the art scene in the 1960s and '70s. I respect his talent, but I neither like nor dislike his work.

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    1. These artists were the new, the avant-guard, since NY has always wanted to be like Paris as far as art and fashion is concerned. That's an IMO, btw.

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  5. I'm inclined to agree, JoJo. I do remember a Midnight Cowboy scene. . . they wanted that NY flavor to the movie, I guess. The Factory was well known in all arty circles.

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  6. Warhol was an eccentric free spirit. Odd combination I know, but it fits.

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    1. New York and Warhol went together. I think most of the artists loved his brashness.

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  7. HI, D. G,

    I KNEW you would pick Warhol... such an icon! LOVE his work...

    Never heard about the Factory though...

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    1. Maybe it (The Factory) was a well kept secret, in case the guys in blue were interested. . .

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  8. Art is a reflection of its time (or can be) and I think this is true of Warhols work--the "Swinging Sixties." Think of all the political events, Vietnam, also Woodstock on and on.

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    1. Didn't the Swinging Sixties refer to the social mores of the day, e.g., cavorting a la bacchanalia?.

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  9. Warhol was a product of his times. I do not think anyone could emerge emotionally sane and well from the media attention he sought and won, and the influence he attained.

    I do not think I would enjoy an evening with him as I would an afternoon with Thoreau or a night on the town with Oscar Wilde -- or Olivia Wilde for that matter. :-)

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    1. That comment seemed to follow a predictable trail. . .
      I'd pick: A Saturday night out with Wilde, and a Sunday walk in the forest with Thoreau, that's balance.

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  10. I've just been reading an article about Andy Warhol's lost computer art found 30 years later. If you're interested here's the link (just copy and paste it): http://edition.cnn.com/2014/04/24/us/andy-warhol-lost-art/index.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+rss%2Fcnn_topstories+%28RSS%3A+Top+Stories%29

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    1. I did go and read that article, interesting. I guess curiosity led to another discovery . Thanks for the tip.

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  11. I am familiar with Andy. One of my students did their senior project on him and his art.

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    1. I'm glad to hear the art interest is still there for this artist who liked to live on the edge.

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  12. Even though I have never studies art, and I live in Australia, I know of Andy Warhol's art. It is certainly distinctive.
    I am visiting as part of the A to Z Challenge.

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    1. I'm not surprised that you know about Warhol, and that's a great way to describe it, as Distinctive. Thanks for visiting, Wangiwriter.

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  13. It totally makes sense that he was a commercial artist. I struggle with finding value with his art if I look at how much effort other artists (Van Gogh, Monet, Dali) put into their work. But beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

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    1. The Industrial art trend, and some of the other modern styles felt that there was nothing more that could be done in Fine Art, that the US had become a nation controlled by the products that its citizens felt defined the American Dream. It was the age of Advertising. . . at least that's what I heard.

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  14. I didn't know about The Factory at all - glad to see from the comments that I'm not the only one!
    I once wrote a story about a rescue dog who ended up with the name Edie Sedgwick after one of Warhol's superstars. I thought that was such a fun name and she was in fact a superstar. :)

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    1. Amazing research. I heard about it in art school, since there was a question of Warhol using others in an assembly line approach.

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    2. I better clarify that, using 'others in an assembly line approach' to produce works of art (re printmaking or silkscreen process, etc) Is it a work of the artist or the group?

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