Friday, April 11, 2014

J = Johan Jongkind - A to Z Blog Challenge 2014

ART: Artists, Art Trivia, Art Legends

A glimpse of the ART world, in the manner of an alphabetical mini-art tour. ART focuses on  the artists and the art style movements from the 1800's - 1960's. There are exceptions.


Johan Jongkind, Photo taken c.1890, PD*-WC


J = Johan Jongkind
1819 -  1891


Johan Barthold Jongkind was a Dutch painter and printmaker regarded as a forerunner of Impressionism. His work had a strong influence on Claude Monet

In 1846, he moved to the Montmartre district of Paris. Jongkind returned to Rotterdam in 1855, and remained until 1860. In 1861, he rented a studio on the rue de Chevreuse in Montparnasse. It was there that some of his paintings began to show glimpses of the Impressionist style to come. In 1862, in Normandy, he met with his artist friends, Alfred Sisley, Eugene Boudin, and the young Claude Monet; he served as a mentor to them all.



The Seine and Notre-Dame in Paris, 1864, Johan Jongkind, Musée d'Orsay, Paris


Jongkind's most frequent subject was the marine landscape, which he painted in Holland and France. Many of his works depict the Seine River, in the area near Notre Dame Cathedral. In 1878, Jongkind and his female companion moved to live in a small town in southeastern France. He died there in 1891.

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For contrast, here is a view of the same perspective, taken a little closer to Notre Dame and at bridge level, rather than below.


The Seine River and Notre Dame, Paris, 2010 by DG Hudson
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Is Jongkind a name you've heard of? Can you see the start of the Impressionist style in his painting?
 
Please let me know you were here by leaving a comment, and thanks for dropping by! I'll respond.

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Brought to you by the A to Z Blog Challenge 2014 Team and the originator: Lee of Tossing it Out. Click the A to Z list of participants and read on. Hope to see you again throughout the blogfest.




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References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johan_Jongkind

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IMAGE Credits

Photo of Jongkind:

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Painting: The Seine and Notre-Dame in Paris, 1864

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This image is in the public domain in the United States. In most cases, this means that it was first published prior to January 1, 1923 (see the template documentation for more cases). Other jurisdictions may have other rules, and this image might not be in the public domain outside the United States. See Wikipedia:Public domain and Wikipedia:Copyrights for more details.

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19 comments:

  1. Very cool to see the photo with the same view as the painting. They are both gorgeous.

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    1. When I saw the painting, I knew I had photographed the same view. Glad you liked the comparison.

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  2. How interesting that you took that picture. I will answer No to your first question and Yes to the second. Great series, I'm learning about painters I never heard of before.

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    1. I came to love Notre Dame Cathedral, it was familiar as it was near our rented apt. and the peacefulness in its square surprised me. (even when its full of people). So, took lots of pix of it. That photo above is a favorite. Jongkind must have liked the Seine as much as me.

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  3. I had never heard of Jongkind. I had to look twice at the painting. It almost looked like a photograph.

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    1. I had heard of him, but not researched him, so I'm learning too. His painting reminded me that I had seen that scene before! I do like a few Dutch painters. Look for Rembrandt later in this series. . .

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  4. Yes, I can see the beginning of Impressionism in his work. I like the art better than the original (no offense to your picture-taking). The colors are just brighter in the painting... particularly the sky. I also really like what he did with the water and the cobbled stone of the path. It is interesting to note that your photo has trees and a lamp post that are not in his painting. That is progress and the changes that occur over time. It is nice to see that landscape preserved as it was.

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    1. No offense taken. I just clicked. He had to paint his image. I love the soft colors in that painting too. There are still many cobbled streets in Paris, in the Marais and Montmartre.

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  5. Very cool art, and I love that word "forerunner." :)

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    1. You probably never know you're a forerunner when you're alive.

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  6. Jongkind, in his photo, looks like he is dreaming up a practical joke. Robin's take on the water and cobblestones.

    I had never heard of Jongkind before -- thanks for introducing me. :-)

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    1. My pleasure, the cobblestones probably proved to be weapons at one time or another. . .

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  7. No, I've never heard of him... But I do see the beginnings of impressionism in the clouds and sky..
    The building have a more flat, cartoon like feel to them.

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    1. Interesting observation, he probably liked painting the water and sky better than the buildings. . .

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  8. No, I haven't heard of him, but LOVE his work! Thanks so much for the introduction. It was perfect you putting a real life perspective beneath his painting so as to give us the artist's point of view. Really lovely...

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    1. Glad you liked it, Lisa! His colors do remind me of Monet's.

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  9. I can see how Monet was influenced - lovely painting.
    Great A-Z.

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