Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Y = Yamato-e, Japanese Painting - A to Z Challenge

ART: Artists, Art Trivia, Art Legends

A glimpse of the ART world, in the manner of an alphabetical mini-art tour. ART focuses on artists and art movements. This painting style goes back to the 15th century.



Y = Yamamoto-e
 Japanese Classic



 Illustration of the The Tale of Genji*, Wakamurasaki, 1617–1691

 
Yamato-e is a style of Japanese painting inspired by Tang Dynasty paintings, and fully developed by the late Heian period. It is considered the classical Japanese style. This term has been used to distinguish traditional Japanese painting from Chinese style paintings (Kara-e), a style inspired by Chinese ink wash paintings.

Characteristic features of Yamato-e include many small figures and details of buildings and other objects, with the artist selecting a few of the elements in a scene to be fully depicted. The viewpoint is often aerial, with cutaway rooftops in some illustrations. Landscapes are very stylized.

Yamato-e style painting is often used for a narrative story, with or without text. These paintings can deal with the beauty of nature, the four seasons or famous places. The work is often on scrolls for the wall, or handscrolls that read from right to left, a folding screen or a panel. There was a Yamato period in Japanese history, but no Yamato-e paintings survived.
This style is not restricted to a particular period.


The Tale of Genji*, a classic work of Japanese literature written by the noblewoman and lady in waiting Murasaki Shikigu in the early years of the 11th century.


ART TRIVIA  - Claude Monet, French artist was a collector of Japanese art and displayed part of his collection on the walls of his Garden house in Giverny, France. No photos allowed inside, however, for the protection of the art.

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Did you know about Yamato-e style painting? Do you like the aerial viewpoint and lush colors?

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Brought to you by the A to Z Blog Challenge 2014 Team and the originator: Lee of Tossing it Out. Click the A to Z list of participants and read on.





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References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamato-e wiki on Japanese style of painting

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tale_of_Genji The Tale of Genji
 
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/yama/hd_yama.htm Yamato-e Painting, Metropolitan Museum of Art

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IMAGE credit:

Illustration of the The Tale of Genji, Wakamurasaki, credited to Tosa Mitsuoki (1617–1691) late 17th century

This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons. This is a faithful photographic reproduction of a two-dimensional, public domain work of art. The work of art itself is in the public domain for the following reason:

This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights

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19 comments:

  1. Hi DG .. an interesting arena of art types - I know a little about Japanese works of art .. but this is a particular type I wasn't aware of. I rather like the Yamato-e style ... and it's way of telling a story ..

    My machine is back .. but will be retired shortly! Thanks for your thoughts ... I'll keep an eye out for these types of paintings in the future .. cheers Hilary

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    1. I like it too, Hilary, and it was an interesting style that I discovered in my research for the A to Z. Good luck with the new connection when it arrives.

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  2. I wonder what they used for their pigments to make the paints and/or inks?

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    1. In the 15th century - likely natural sources, like rocks, or plants, The history of paint and how the artists acquired or made their own is interesting in itself.

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  3. I remember studying a bit of Japanese art in high school. Not much though.

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    1. Japanese art has a much higher profile now that ANIME and other forms are popular.

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  4. It is very distinctive. I like it.

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    1. It's more stylized than much of the other art I have featured. Design is important.

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  5. I lived in Japan for a few years and my parents still have a lot of the artwork they purchased while there.

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    1. That's very nice. Buying on location is my fave way to obtain art. Smart parents.

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  6. The museum nearby had a gallery of these a while ago. Truly exquisite work. :)

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    1. I would have so been there, DPK. Lucky you to have seen the show.

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  7. I've always liked the Japanese style of painting.

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    1. There is something to be said for order and tradition. It appeals to me too.

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  8. I have two Japanese wood cuts that I framed and love to look at and see all the little details. The French painters in the 19th Century were so interested in Japanese art and many collected it. There was a wave of interest--wasn't the Mikado about that time? So Britain and France were fascinated.

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    1. Just checked and the Mikado opened in the late 1880s, so that may be when Europe sought the exotic in the Orient, as they also did for African Art.

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    2. Just lost my comment...grrr!.

      I love Japanese style, D.G. The feeling of peace that the gentle lines and colours give. I especially love when water is included, as in the example you give.

      Thanks for an interesting post, as always.

      Denise

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  9. Japanese art is one of the most delicate, subtle of classical art.

    Damyanti, Co-host A to Z Challenge April 2014, My Latest post

    Twitter: @AprilA2Z
    #atozchallenge

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  10. I am familiar with this art and LOVE the colors and aerial views. Brings an unusual perspective to the scene...

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