Thursday, April 10, 2014

I = Ingres, French Artist and Painter - A to Z Blog Challenge

ART: Artists, Art Trivia, Art Legends

A glimpse of the ART world, in the manner of an alphabetical mini-art tour. ART focuses on artists and art movements between the 1850's-1960's. There are exceptions.




Ingres, Artist, Self-portrait at age 24, PD*-WC


I = Ingres, Jean-Auguste-Dominique
1780 – 1867


A French Neoclassical painter, Ingres also played the violin. His actual skill on the violin is a matter of dispute. As a man respectful of the past, he assumed the role of protector of the status quo in painting against his perceived rival, Eugene Delacroix, who represented the new Romantic style of painting. He studied and borrowed from earlier art, adopting the style most appropriate. By the end of his life, Ingres' portraits, painted and drawn, were recognized as his greatest legacy.


Modern opinion considers Ingres and some of the other Neoclassicists as 'Romantic' spirits of an earlier sort. This is especially true of Ingres' expressive distortions of form and space. Elegance of line was paramount. His technical abilities won him many awards, but like most artists, he suffered some major thumbs-down reviews from the critics. Ingres influenced a later generation of artists. His most significant were: Degas, Picasso and Matisse.


At 71 years of age, Ingres married for the second time to a 43 year old woman, a relative of a friend. It was a happy marriage and seemed to inspire more painting. In 1853, he painted the Apotheosis of Napoleon I, for the ceiling of a hall in the Hotel de Ville in Paris. It was destroyed by fire in the Commune of 1871.


Ingres died of pneumonia in January of 1867, at the age of 86, having kept his faculties until the last. He is interred in the Pere Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, in a tomb sculpted by his student Jean-Marie Bonnassieux. He bequeathed the contents of his studio, a number of major paintings, over 4000 drawings, and his violin to the city museum of Montauban, now called the Musée Ingres.

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A sketch that shows the technical expertise of Ingres' drawing skills:

Portrait of Victor Baltard's wife and daughter Paule.



Portrait of Baltard's wife and child by Ingres


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Have you heard of Ingres or know his work? Did you know of the animosity between Ingres and Delacroix? Do you like the Neoclassical style better than the Romantic? (Both styles took liberties with the image and its presentation, in the interest of art.)


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Brought to you by the A to Z Blog Challenge 2014 Team and the originator: Lee of Tossing it Out. Click the A to Z list of participants and read on. Hope to see you again throughout the blogfest!


A to Z Blog Challenge 2014



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References:

Image Credits

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Auguste_Dominique_Ingres - Wiki on Ingres, with some example of his work

Images: 1) Self-Portrait at 24, and 2) Portrait of Baltard's wife and child.
 Same public domain details for both images.

This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons.
This is a faithful photographic reproduction of a two-dimensional, public domain work of art.

The work of art itself is in the public domain for the following reason:  
This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less

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22 comments:

  1. I'd never heard of Ingres.
    I can understand artists painting self-portraits when they are young, as they would always be remembered at their best. I have only one photo in my younger years, and very few later - and a snapshot is so simple.
    I'll have to try to catch up with you more often. I've always wanted to learn more about art/artists.

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    1. I'd love for you to drop by more often. This A to Z theme will become a new tab at the top and a collection of artists and art info.

      Ingres, like some writers, will be forgotten if we don't bring them back into the public memory.

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  2. His use of light was wonderful wasn't it? It is great that he found inspiration in his marriage at such a late age :)

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    1. A soul's inspiration can be found at any time in one's life. We just have to recognize it. I would love to have his portrait skills.

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  3. I am not familiar with Ingres or his work. I love art and have way too much of it in my house--on the walls, but I like it that way.

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    1. I had not seen his sketches before, and I loved the faces on the mother and child in the one shown above..

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  4. This series is showing me everything I do not know about art... which is a large uncharted territory.

    Never heard of Ingres, but I like his work.

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    1. He definitely had skill, but a petulant temper too. So the information implies when I was researching. You know your music, Robin, that's impressive.

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  5. I'd never heard of him. I love that portrait, the expressions on the faces of the woman and child are amazing.

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    1. The woman seemed to enjoy posing for the artist. Her eyes are beautiful and draw you in to the sketch. As does the child's face.

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  6. I haven't heard of him before, but I really like the lines in the drawing you selected. This is such a great learning experience for me. Even if I know of someone, you pick out the details of their life and the painters and movements they have influenced. It's like taking an art class, something I have never done.

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    1. I did consider being an art teacher for elementary grades early on, so your comment pleases me much, Inger. I like showing that the lives of artists, like writers, are interesting, and it makes their art so much more alive when they seem more human.

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  7. I love his portrait of the wife and child. He re-married a 43 year old at 71? Gives us all hope. And he kept his faculties to the end -- which is a great blessing.

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    1. Yes, there is hope and the happy marriage did inspire his art, so take heart, but remember he did keep his faculties. His first marriage went well too, so perhaps he knew how to treat the ladies. . .

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  8. One of those wonderful multi-taskers, even if he might not have been as good on he violin as usually claimed.

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    1. Unless that rumor was started by Delacroix. . . you're right, some of these artists are multi-taskers.

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  9. I had never heard of Ingres. He seems to have been quite talented.

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    1. I like his drawings, most artists begin with a sketch or study.

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  10. I prefer the Romantic to the Neo-Classicist have always appreciated Ingres style though.Delacroix is a favorite of mine.
    Thanks for sharing Ingres been awhile since I've enjoyed his work.
    The "i" in disibility

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    1. The Romantics are easy to like, they incite patriotic fervor, especially Delacroix. Thanks for visiting. I had problems commenting at your blog but will try again later. Good luck with the Dragon series.

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  11. LOVE this artist... His exquisite use of light and form is truly magnificent!

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    1. I like his work, too. But I'd buy the Romantic painting. . .by Delacroix.

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